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Standing Our Ground: Reproductive Justice for Marissa Alexander

Marissa Alexander

The over-policing and over-criminalization of pregnant women and mothers is becoming a major issue in this country, and the safety of mothers is at stake.

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‘John’ or Child Rapist? On Holding Buyers of Child Sex Accountable

It’s time to collectively demand we hold all exploiters of children accountable, both traffickers and buyers of child sex.

With as much emphasis as there has been on the crisis of human trafficking recently, there is almost complete disregard for the unfettered demand that is fueling this multibillion dollar industry. It’s time to collectively demand we hold all exploiters of children accountable, both traffickers and buyers of child sex.

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Inside the Pilot Project That Grants Tribal Authority Over Domestic Violence Cases

Umatilla County, Oregon

As of February 20, three federally recognized tribes have the power to arrest and prosecute non-Natives who assault Native intimate partners, under a pilot project to test a historic expansion of special domestic violence criminal jurisdiction.

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Banning ‘Bossy’ Won’t Help Black Women and Girls Seeking Justice

For many Black women, being called "bossy" and being bossy have the potential to save and change our lives, as we saw in the recent events surrounding CeCe McDonald (above) and Marissa Alexander.

Sheryl Sandberg and others want to see us ban the word “bossy” when talking about girls. But for many Black women, being called “bossy” and being bossy have the potential to save and change our lives.

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Report Tackles Supreme Court Ruling on Workplace Harassment

More than three million lower-level supervisors exercise significant control over the daily working lives of more than 17 million low-wage workers, according to the report.

A new report from the National Women’s Law Center argues, among other things, that Congress should pass the Fair Employment Protection Act to correct the narrow definition of a supervisor created by last summer’s Supreme Court decision in Vance v. Ball State University.

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Christian Colleges Have a Sexual Assault Problem

Stories of mishandling and outright ignoring cases of sexual assault within religious institutions go back decades.

Stories of mishandling and outright ignoring cases of sexual assault within religious institutions go back decades.

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How a Pennsylvania Domestic Violence Bill Became Anti-Worker and Anti-Survivor

The seemingly non-controversial bill got derailed earlier this month when state legislators approved an amendment preventing local governments from passing new work leave policies.

The seemingly non-controversial bill got derailed earlier this month when state legislators approved an amendment preventing local governments from passing new work leave policies, which could threaten the livelihood of survivors of domestic violence, crime, or abuse.

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When a Fair Trial Isn’t: Violations of Victims’ Privacy in the Legal System

The Dwyer protocol is meant to protect a defendant’s constitutional right to a fair trial by allowing him or her to uncover exculpatory evidence that could impeach a victim’s credibility—such as a victim’s therapy or medical records.

The Dwyer protocol is meant to protect a defendant’s constitutional right to a fair trial by allowing him or her to uncover exculpatory evidence that could impeach a victim’s credibility—such as a victim’s therapy or medical records. The result is that perpetrators get their privacy, while survivors are often robbed of theirs.

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Former Gosnell Employee Sherry West Sentenced

West, a former medical assistant at Kermit Gosnell's "house of horrors" clinic in West Philadelphia, has been sentenced to five to ten years.

West, a former medical assistant at Kermit Gosnell’s “house of horrors” clinic in West Philadelphia, has been sentenced to five to ten years.

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On Prosecutors Having Survivors of Assault Arrested: It’s Not a Zero-Sum Game

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A recent Slate piece argued that coercing testimony from survivors of violence means more victims testifying, which means more offenders jailed, which means less DV and sexual assault. However, this position is, as it turns out, largely nonexistent in the real world.

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