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This Week in Sex: Prostate Cancer Sexually Transmitted? And State STI Rankings

Harvey Milk, circa 1978.

This week, a new study presents evidence that the parasite that causes trich might lead to prostate cancer, a new list shows the best and worst states for STIs, a Gallup poll shows the most support ever for same-sex marriage, and gay rights activist Harvey Milk is honored with a stamp.

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Listen to Youth: Adult Allies Must Support the Repeal of Illinois’ Forced Parental Notification Law

While forced parental involvement laws aren’t new, more states have been passing them or tightening their existing laws to decrease access to abortion for teens.

While forced parental involvement laws aren’t new, more states have been passing them or tightening their existing laws to decrease access to abortion for teens.

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Kansas County Rejects State Funds for Contraception After Commissioner Conflates IUDs With Abortifacients

Despite the fact that IUDs and other forms of contraception prevent pregnancy from occurring, and therefore cannot cause an abortion, Saline County Commissioner John Price said during a meeting Tuesday, “I think it is murder to take this [grant money]. To me it is murder, and I am not standing for it.”

Despite the fact that IUDs and other forms of contraception prevent pregnancy from occurring, and therefore cannot cause an abortion, Saline County Commissioner John Price said during a meeting Tuesday, “I think it is murder to take this [grant money]. To me it is murder, and I am not standing for it.”

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Louisiana Legislature Continues to Restrict Sex Education

In three separate votes in the last two weeks, the Louisiana legislature has decided to stick to its brand of restrictive sex education despite having higher than average teen pregnancy and birth rates and alarmingly high rates of HIV diagnosis in young people.

In three separate votes in the last two weeks, the Louisiana legislature has decided to stick to its brand of restrictive sex education despite having higher than average teen pregnancy and birth rates and alarmingly high rates of HIV diagnosis in young people.

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HPV May Be Even More Common Than Previously Thought

3D rendition of the human papillomavirus.

A new DNA study found that more than two-thirds of healthy Americans have one or more strains of human papillomavirus in their skin, vagina, mouth, or gut. Researchers, however, insist that people should not overreact to these findings “until the harm or benefit of most of these strains becomes apparent.”

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On Abortion, Speech, and the Catholic Campus: Vatican Responds to Petition Against Georgetown

Georgetown University

A recent petition by William Peter Blatty—a Georgetown graduate who’s best known for writing The Exorcist—is aimed at forcing the university to conform to a strict and exclusionary vision of Catholic identity, and it’s been yellow-lighted by a Vatican representative.

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South Carolina Senate Committee Approves HPV Vaccine Bill, Amid Opposition

The South Carolina Senate Medical Affairs Committee passed a bill on Thursday that would allow—but not require—the state to create brochures about the HPV vaccine and provide vaccines to underinsured seventh graders. The bill, however, faces opposition, including from the governor.

The South Carolina Senate Medical Affairs Committee passed a bill on Thursday that would allow—but not require—the state to create brochures about the HPV vaccine and provide vaccines to underinsured seventh graders. The bill, however, faces opposition, including from the governor.

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Why Now Is a Terrible Time to Disrupt Care for Women Living With HIV

A significant source of care for women, infants, children, and youth living with HIV is under attack.

May 11-17 marks National Women’s Health Week, when women are encouraged to get checkups and health screenings and build relationships with their health-care providers. Meanwhile, a significant source of care for women, infants, children, and youth living with HIV is under attack.

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Study: Rates of Cervical Cancer in the United States Higher Than Previously Thought

About 12,000 women in the United States get cervical cancer each year.

About 12,000 women in the United States get cervical cancer each year. While this number has not gone up, researchers have recalculated the rate of cervical cancer in the country and found that it’s higher than we thought, with some groups at much higher risk than previously believed.

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The NYPD Finally Changes Condoms-as-Evidence Policy, But Leaves Giant Loophole

In the wake of public pressure and impending legislative action, the NYPD has finally changed its policy of allowing officers to seize condoms as evidence of prostitution.

In the wake of public pressure and impending legislative action, the NYPD has finally changed its policy of allowing officers to seize condoms as evidence of prostitution. But the revised policy contains a loophole that advocates fear will continue to inhibit condom use.

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