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Sexual Health Roundup: Promising Advances in HIV Prevention and Treatment; New Evidence on HPV, Cancer, and Vaccines

In this week’s sexual health roundup: scientists use engineered stem-cells to attack HIV; California tests a new pill that prevents HIV infection when taken daily but some question how expensive it is; the CDC releases alarming data on cancers caused by HPV in women; and South Carolina lawmakers take steps to increase HPV vaccination among middle school students.

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Getting Young People to Get Themselves Tested … As a First Step

We need to make sure that young people are getting tested if they have had unprotected sex, getting educated, and using the tools and resources available to them to prevent both STD transmission and unintended pregnancy. 

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Preventing Sexually Transmitted Infections: The Power is Yours to Take Charge of Your Health

STIs affect people of all races, ages, and sexual orientations, though some individuals experience greater challenges in protecting their health. When individual risk behaviors are combined with barriers to quality health information and STI prevention services, the risk of infection increases. Increasing access to testing is key.

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Teen Birth Rates Are Down: Ten Proven Assertions About Why We’re Succeeding

To confront the most often-repeated misrepresentations, I ask readers to consider these ten assertions about sexual health and education in the United States.

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Title X and The Role of Family Planning Providers in Preventing and Treating Sexually Transmitted Infections

To ensure quality sexual and reproductive health and address economic burdens, continued efforts to educate, screen, test, and treat for STDs is critical to our nation’s public health and well-being.

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Teens Given the Opportunity to Know the Facts before Engaging in the Acts

One in two sexually active people will get an STD by age 25, but most won’t even know it.  Just as abstinence is the only 100 percent effective way to prevent pregnancy, the only way to be sure of your STD status is to get tested. April is the time to do it—STD Awareness Month.

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It’s 2012. Shouldn’t College Students Know to Wrap It Up Already? (A Graduate Student’s Perspective)

It is impractical to believe that college students will not be sexually active. Not using the appropriate preventive measures (i.e. a condom) can lead to both unintended and unwanted consequences, high-risk situations or not. It is obvious that changes need to be made. But where to begin?

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Opening STD Awareness Month with a Success Story: HPV and Cervical Cancer

I want to open this STD Awareness Blog series with a STD complication success story: fighting cervical cancer. Because here’s the thing: cervical cancer is almost completely preventable. This means that, given consistent and correct care, you will likely never been one of those 4,000 women who die of this preventable and treatable disease.

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Sexual Health Roundup: Say Goodbye to Your Annual Pap Test But Don’t Forget to Get Tested for Chlamydia

This week: Too few young women get tested for Chlamydia, circumcised men have lower rates of prostate cancer, new guidelines recommend less frequent Pap tests, and young people in the South fare worse than their peers when it comes to sexual health.

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Governor Perry, WHP Has Been a Lifeline for My Family. Why Are You Eliminating It?

My name is Rene, and I am graduate student. I am also on the Women’s Health Program (WHP). Many of the women on the WHP are college students like myself, trying to better their lives with a higher education. We shouldn’t have to choose between paying for a cancer screening and paying our bills while we’re trying to further our education.

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