· · · · · 

It’s 2012. Shouldn’t College Students Know to Wrap It Up Already? (A Graduate Student’s Perspective)

It is impractical to believe that college students will not be sexually active. Not using the appropriate preventive measures (i.e. a condom) can lead to both unintended and unwanted consequences, high-risk situations or not. It is obvious that changes need to be made. But where to begin?

· · · · · 

Opening STD Awareness Month with a Success Story: HPV and Cervical Cancer

I want to open this STD Awareness Blog series with a STD complication success story: fighting cervical cancer. Because here’s the thing: cervical cancer is almost completely preventable. This means that, given consistent and correct care, you will likely never been one of those 4,000 women who die of this preventable and treatable disease.

· · · · · 

Sexual Health Roundup: Say Goodbye to Your Annual Pap Test But Don’t Forget to Get Tested for Chlamydia

This week: Too few young women get tested for Chlamydia, circumcised men have lower rates of prostate cancer, new guidelines recommend less frequent Pap tests, and young people in the South fare worse than their peers when it comes to sexual health.

· · · · · 

Governor Perry, WHP Has Been a Lifeline for My Family. Why Are You Eliminating It?

My name is Rene, and I am graduate student. I am also on the Women’s Health Program (WHP). Many of the women on the WHP are college students like myself, trying to better their lives with a higher education. We shouldn’t have to choose between paying for a cancer screening and paying our bills while we’re trying to further our education.

· · · · · 

New Pornography Regulations In LA: Are They Addressing the Right Problem?

On January 25, the mayor of Los Angeles signed regulation that requires the use of condoms by all performers in adult movies filmed within the city’s borders. Public health advocates have unsurprisingly celebrated the regulation, but there are some reasons why the ordinance may not be as effective as one might hope.

· · · · · 

Looking Forward, Looking Back: Two Perspectives on Leadership, Culture, and the Sexual Health Movement

In the years ahead, Advocates will continue to be a dynamic leader in promoting the rights of youth to information, education, and services. I am deeply committed to our current, innovative work expanding adolescent access to contraception domestically and internationally; fighting homophobia in schools and communities across the United States; and using our policy work on the Hill and with the administration to advance the goals of our state and local partners.

· · · · · 

The Role of Community Health Centers in Reducing Cervical Cancer Inequities

Cervical cancer incidence rates vividly demonstrate inequities in our health care systems and in health outcomes. Women in rural areas, the elderly, those with less formal education, and women of color, for example, experience disproportionately high rates of cervical cancer. Meanwhile, in rural communities, uninsured white women have some of the poorest access to routine screening of any patient population.

· · · · · 

Cervical Cancer and Women of Color: What Will it Take to Get to Zero?

It is no secret that women of color—specifically Black and Latina women—are at greatest risk of cervical cancer. Ending cervical cancer will be no easy task. Great strides can be made by taking a multi-level approach to the problem, which includes expanding knowledge, empowering Black women to make their health a priority, and continued advocacy efforts.

· · · · · 

How We Can Beat Cervical Cancer

In 2007, 12,280 women in the United States were told they had cervical cancer, and 4,021 died from the disease. Here’s the thing: cervical cancer is almost completely preventable.  This means that, given consistent and correct care, you will likely never be one of those 4,000 women who die of this preventable and treatable disease.

· · · · · 

The Role of “Men” in Preventing HPV-Related Cervical Cancer

Men have an important role to play in preventing the spread of HPV. It is too common for women (particularly women of color) to have barriers to screening services or accessing this vaccine. This makes it even more important for men to seek the vaccine and to encourage the women in their lives (particularly the ones they are having sex with) to also be vaccinated.

· · · · ·