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Successful Home Visit Program for Mothers and Infants Lacks Long-Term Funding

(left to right) Chrystal Towne, RN; her former client, Sheren Sucilla, and Darcy Lowell, MD, testify on the effectiveness of the Maternal, Infant and EArly Childhood Home Visiting Program in the hearing room of the House Ways and Means Committee.

A hearing on the Maternal, Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program revealed impressive results for the low-income families it serves, and the money it saves taxpayers. But its funding runs out in six months.

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Stoking Fire: Doulas as ‘Birth Ambassadors’

From the cover of Birth Ambassadors: Doulas and the Re-Emergence of Woman-Supported Birth in America.

Birth Ambassadors: Doulas and the Re-Emergence of Woman-Supported Birth in America by Christine H. Morton and Elayne G. Clift is a detailed look at childbirth practices that zeroes in on the difficult and sometimes contradictory roles played by members of hospital labor-and-delivery teams.

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Businesses Must Improve Their Family Policies—For ‘Distressed Babies’ and All Workers

Increasing support for family policy among lawmakers is encouraging—but what about the commitment of the private sector?

Increasing support for family policy among lawmakers is encouraging—but what about the commitment of the private sector?

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This Week in Sex: New Research on Maternal and Child Health

This week, we look at new research about maternal and child health, including reports on prenatal screening tests, the importance of the father's age, and cesarean sections.

This week, we look at new research about maternal and child health, including reports on prenatal screening tests, the importance of the father’s age, and cesarean sections.

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In Texas and Canada, Lessons About Who Can—and Should—Make End-of-Life Decisions for Pregnant Persons

The heartbreaking cases of both Robyn Benson and Marlise Munoz illustrate is the need to defer to families and medical professionals, rather than bureaucrats and lawmakers, in making end-of-life decisions for pregnant people.

The heartbreaking cases of both Robyn Benson and Marlise Munoz illustrate the need to defer to families and medical professionals, rather than bureaucrats and lawmakers, in making end-of-life decisions for pregnant persons.

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Munoz Medical Records Detail ‘Distinctly Abnormal’ Fetus

Marlise Munoz

Attorneys say the sex of the now-22-week-old fetus inside Marlise Munoz’s body cannot be determined due to “deformed” lower extremities, and it also suffers from hydrocephalus and an as yet undetermined heart problem.

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Family of Pregnant Texan on Life Support: ‘We Know She’s Gone’

Erick, Mateo, and Marlise Munoz.

The family of a pregnant Texas woman who is on life support against her wishes say they want to educate the public about an advance directives law that has put them through “pure hell.”

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Texas Law Forces Hospital, Family to Keep Pregnant Woman on Life Support Against Her Will

A Texas hospital says it has no choice but to keep a pregnant woman on life support until the fetus she is carrying can be delivered, sometime next year.

A Texas hospital says it has no choice but to keep a pregnant woman on life support until the fetus she is carrying can be delivered, sometime next year.

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Research Shows Philadelphia Failing UN Maternal and Infant Health Goals

Increasing support for family policy among lawmakers is encouraging—but what about the commitment of the private sector?

Philadelphia’s dire performance can be attributed to the collision of two major factors: widespread, profound poverty and a sharp reduction in the number of hospitals providing maternity care.

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Double the Trouble, But Way More Than Twice the Price: Why Is Having Multiples So Expensive?

A new study shows that the cost of having twins is five times higher than the cost of having one baby; triplets or more can cost as much as $400,000. The researchers suggest this is yet another reason to reduce the number of embryos transferred during in vitro fertilization.

A new study shows that the cost of having twins is five times higher than the cost of having one baby; triplets or more can cost as much as $400,000. The researchers suggest this is yet another reason to reduce the number of embryos transferred during in vitro fertilization.

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