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Colorado Bill Would Allow Civil Lawsuits for ‘Unlawful Termination’ of Pregnancy

Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper is expected to sign legislation, passed by the state legislature Monday, allowing women to sue for civil damages if, for example, a drunk driver struck her car and caused her to lose her pregnancy.

Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper is expected to sign legislation, passed by the state legislature Monday, allowing women to sue for civil damages if, for example, a drunk driver struck her car and caused her to lose her pregnancy.

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South Carolina 20-Week Abortion Ban Advances to Senate Floor

The ban was amended to address some of the most pressing concerns from critics, but opponents of the bill say it is still an unconstitutional restriction on women's health.

The ban was amended to address some of the most pressing concerns from critics, but opponents of the bill say it is still an unconstitutional restriction on women’s health.

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Alabama Supreme Court Justices Make Case for Prosecuting Abortions

The justices of the Alabama Supreme Court

In a decision interpreting the state’s chemical endangerment statute, two justices of the Alabama Supreme Court argued for jailing women who terminate pregnancies.

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Colorado Senator Hammers His Opponent on Choice Issues

Democratic Sen. Mark Udall (left) claimed Monday that his opponent, Rep. Cory Gardner (R) (right), supports federal personhood legislation, even though Gardner recently unendorsed a state "personhood" amendment.

Democratic Sen. Mark Udall claimed Monday that his opponent, Rep. Cory Gardner (R), supports federal personhood legislation, even though Gardner recently unendorsed a state “personhood” amendment.

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Bullets Dodged: The Anti-Choice Bills That Didn’t Pass This Year

For every awful anti-choice bill that passes into law, there are about a dozen others that fail, or indeed never see the light of day. Here's a list of some major bullets dodged so far this year in the state legislatures.

For every odious anti-choice bill that passes into law, there are about a dozen others that fail, or never see the light of day. Here’s a list of some major bullets dodged so far this year in the state legislatures.

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Florida Legislature Passes ‘Viability’ Abortion Restriction

The Florida legislature gave final approval on Friday to a bill that would further restrict later abortions in the state.

The Florida legislature gave final approval on Friday to a bill that would further restrict later abortions in the state.

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Legal Wrap: The Roberts Court Makes a Mess of Just About Everything

It was a bad week for equality and social justice at the Supreme Court.

It was a bad week for equality and social justice at the Supreme Court.

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New Hampshire Rejects Fetal Homicide Bill

The New Hampshire Senate on Thursday rejected measures that would have granted "personhood" rights to fetuses killed in a homicide.

The New Hampshire Senate on Thursday rejected measures that would have granted “personhood” rights to fetuses killed in a homicide.

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Florida Legislature Passes Fetal Homicide Bill

The Florida state senate gave final approval on Wednesday to the "Unborn Victims of Violence Act," which will make it a crime to kill or injure a fetus at any stage of development during an attack on a pregnant woman.

The Florida Senate gave final approval on Wednesday to the “Unborn Victims of Violence Act,” which will make it a crime to kill or injure a fetus at any stage of development during an attack on a pregnant woman.

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Colorado Lawmakers Withdraw Reproductive Health Freedom Act

Supporters say the bill would have been one of the most comprehensive responses by a state government to the growing list of restrictions that states have placed on reproductive health care.

Under pressure from Denver Archbishop Samuel Aquila, Democrats have withdrawn legislation in Colorado that would have proactively stopped government entities from blocking women’s reproductive health decisions.

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