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Bolstering Modern Contraception Could Prevent 15 Million Unintended Pregnancies Every Year

New study suggests that increased use of modern contraception in low- and middle-income countries could prevent 15 million unintended pregnancies.

New study suggests that increased use of modern contraception in low- and middle-income countries could prevent 15 million unintended pregnancies.

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Legal Wrap: States Start Sessions With Rush of Anti-Abortion Measures

The legislative session kicked off in the states with a bunch of new anti-abortion bills and the first-ever conviction in Indiana of a pregnant woman for feticide for a self-induced abortion.

The legislative session kicked off in the states with a bunch of new anti-abortion bills, along with the conviction of an Indiana woman for feticide and neglect of a dependent.

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Another Appeals Court Rejects Challenge to Birth Control Benefit

The federal courts are so far unanimous in rejecting claims that the Obama administration's accommodation process to the birth control benefit burdens religious rights.

The federal courts are so far unanimous in rejecting claims that the Obama administration’s accommodation process to the birth control benefit burdens religious rights.

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Natural Family Planning Methods Can Work, But They Take a Big Commitment

The Pope drew attention to natural family planning methods when he suggested there are ways for Catholic women to limit the number of children they have without violating the Church's teachings on contraception. But just how do these methods work? And how good are they?

The Pope drew attention to natural family planning methods when he suggested there are ways for Catholic women to limit the number of children they have without violating the Church’s teachings on contraception. But just how do these methods work? And how good are they?

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This Week in Sex: Birth Control on ‘Downton Abbey,’ and Not Much Sex in Japan

This week, the FDA warns of real Viagra in supposedly all natural supplements, a survey finds less than half of adults in Japan had sex in the last month, and we theorize about what method of contraception was available to the ladies of Downton Abbey.

This week, the FDA warns of real Viagra in supposedly all natural supplements, a survey finds less than half of adults polled in Japan had sex in the last month, and we theorize about what method of contraception was available to the ladies of Downton Abbey.

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Black Women Push ‘In Our Own Voice’ Reproductive Justice Agenda

Reproductive justice, organizers noted, is the belief that all women have the right to have children, the right not to have children, and the right to parent the children they have in a safe and healthy environment.

The agenda is “a powerful platform for us to really organize ourselves, to speak on our own behalf, and to be at the table when decisions are being made about us,” said La’Tasha Mayes, founder and executive director at New Voices Pittsburgh.

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The IUD Comeback Continues Apace

Intrauterine devices were popular until the '70s, when one model caused infertility and even death in some women. Though the new generation of IUDs are safe and effective, it has been a slow climb back to their previous rates of acceptance.

Intrauterine devices were popular until the ’70s, when one model caused infertility and even death in some women. Though the new generation of IUDs are safe and effective, it has been a slow climb back to their previous rates of acceptance.

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ACLU Accuses Another Catholic Hospital in Michigan of Compromising Patient Care

Genesys Health System has stopped offering tubal ligations to cesarean section patients because such procedures violate Catholic doctrine, according to a letter sent to to Michigan’s Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs by the American Civil Liberties Union.

Genesys Health System has stopped offering tubal ligations to cesarean section patients because such procedures violate Catholic doctrine, according to a letter sent to to Michigan’s Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs by the American Civil Liberties Union.

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Condoms Are Way More Effective Than the New York Times Says They Are

Last week, New York Times columnist, Nicholas Kristof wrote a great op-ed entitled, “Politics, Teens and Birth Control,” in which he eloquently described teen pregnancy as a problem of irresponsible adults not hormone-addled teens. Unfortunately, the article includes a misleading statistic that suggests people who rely on condoms for pregnancy prevention will eventually, inevitably become pregnant.

Unfortunately, Nicholas Kristof’s great op-ed on teenage pregnancy in the New York Times last week included a misleading statistic that suggests people who rely on condoms for pregnancy prevention will eventually, inevitably become pregnant.

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Even Conservative States Are Increasing Access to IUDs for Medicaid Recipients

In an effort to reduce unintended pregnancy and improve birth outcomes, some states are working to make intrauterine devices easier for Medicaid patients to access.

In an effort to reduce unintended pregnancy and improve birth outcomes, some states are working to make intrauterine devices easier for Medicaid patients to access.

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