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Sexual Health Roundup: CDC Say Hormonal Methods Don’t Increase HIV Risk and Cheaters Less Likely to Have Safe Sex

In this week’s sexual health round up: a CDC review of available evidence found that hormonal contraception (including Depo-Provera) does not increase a woman’s risk of contracting or transmitting HIV; a new study found that cheaters were less likely to practice safer sex than those in open relationships; an online club will send you condoms for as little of $1 a month; and a man steals a vibrator for a reason.

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Sexual Health Roundup: Mississippi Sex-Ed Deadline Looms and Survey Finds LGBT Teens Are Less Happy

Sexual Health Roundup: A Mississippi mandate for sexuality education means that school districts have to choose between and abstinence-only or an abstinence-based approach by the end of the month; a survey by the Human Rights Campaign finds that LGBT teens are less happy than their straight peers; and a new condom company promises that for every condom sold it will donate one condom to women in regions with high HIV rates. 

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The 30 for 30 Campaign: Fighting for Women With HIV and AIDS

I talk to C. Virginia Fields the Chairman of the 30 for 30 Campaign, which has brought together numerous national and local advocacy and service delivery organizations to focus on the unique needs of women who are affected by HIV and AIDS, especially black women and transgender women. 

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Sexual Health Roundup: New Mexico Health Official Fired for Condom Stance and Vatican Criticizes Nun for Views on Masturbation

New Mexico’s Chief Medical Officer is fired hours after suggesting condoms could prevent STIs among the state’s teenagers; the United Kingdom sees an increase in STIs after the government pulls funding for social marketing campaigns; and the Vatican takes aim at a nun who believes masturbation, same-sex behavior, and same-sex marriage is okay.

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Teen Birth Rates Are Down: Ten Proven Assertions About Why We’re Succeeding

To confront the most often-repeated misrepresentations, I ask readers to consider these ten assertions about sexual health and education in the United States.

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Sexual Health Roundup: States Have Made Little Progress on Sex Education

CDC study finds schools making little progress in sex education; Tennessee lawmakers warn against gateway “sexual behaviors,” and Springfield Massachusetts decides to provide condoms to middle school and high school students.

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Should the University of Wisconsin Promote Safer Sex During Spring Break? The Evidence Says Yes, Unequivocally

A Wisconsin state representative is criticizing the state university’s health center for its decision to distribute condoms before spring break. His arguments—that distributing condoms is like giving students license to have sex—are as old as they are unfounded. 

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New Research Blames Low-Income African American Women for Couples’ Contraceptive Choices

A new study concludes that adolescent girls who get spending money from their boyfriends are more likely to never to use condoms.  Yet again research is holding girls and women responsible for being sexual and moral gatekeepers and devaluing the capacity of men to be active participants in their relationships.

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Contraceptive Coverage: Essential Care for Women of Color

Women of color experience much higher unintended pregnancy rates than their white counterparts. As a group they also suffer higher rates of chronic diseases, including pregnancy-related conditions, which can be prevented with consistent use of contraceptives. The new regulation guaranteeing access to contraception without a co-pay will help greatly with these and other health issues.

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Poking Holes: Too Many Condom Users are Making Mistakes

When used correctly, condoms are a very good form of birth control and the only method (other than abstinence) that can prevent STDs. Unfortunately, new research shows that too many people are not using them correctly. 

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