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This Week in Sex: At-Home STI Tests, New Virus-Killing Condom, and More

This week, LA County is reviving an at-home STI testing service, a new study shows that male circumcision can reduce rates of HIV among women as well as men, and an Australian company gets approval to produce a microbicide condom.

This week, LA County is reviving an at-home STI testing service, a new study shows that male circumcision can reduce rates of HIV among women as well as men, and an Australian company gets approval to produce a microbicide condom.

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Legal Wrap: New Legal Fights Shaping Up Post-‘Hobby Lobby’

The legal landscape after the Supreme Court's Hobby Lobby decision is taking shape, and it's a mess.

The legal landscape after the Supreme Court’s Hobby Lobby decision is taking shape, and it’s a mess.

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WHO: Men Who Have Sex With Men Should Consider Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis

The World Health Organization wants men who have sex with men to work with their health-care providers to assess their personal risk and determine whether PrEP is right for them.

Contrary to some initial reports, the World Health Organization did not declare that all men who have sex with men should start taking PrEP as a means of preventing HIV. Instead, the group wants this population to work with their health-care providers to assess their personal risk and determine whether PrEP is right for them.

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This Week in Sex: HIV Tests, Cameras in Vibrators, and Porn Producers Threaten to Leave the Golden State

A porn producer with a large presence in San Francisco has threatened to move to Las Vegas if a condom law is passed.

This week, a new study shows that just one in five sexually active high school students has been tested for HIV; a porn producer with a large presence in San Francisco threatens to move to Las Vegas if a condom law is passed; and a vibrator lets you record your vagina during masturbation.

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New York Proposes Bill to Blunt Effects of ‘Hobby Lobby’

After a U.S. Senate bill proposing to clarify that corporations cannot use religious belief as a justification to opt out of certain kinds of insurance was blocked on the Senate floor this week, state senates are now picking up efforts to curtail the effects of the ruling.

After a U.S. Senate bill proposing to clarify that corporations cannot use religious belief as a justification to opt out of certain kinds of insurance was blocked on the Senate floor this week, state senates are now picking up efforts to curtail the effects of the ruling.

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The Fault in Our Media

Hazel (Shailene Woodley) and Gus (Ansel Elgort) in The Fault in Our Stars.

Sexual pleasure can be a taboo subject in our society almost everywhere but in our entertainment, where it is arguably overdone. But even in our media, sex seems to be the sole privilege of young, white, single, and non-disabled people. That’s what makes John Green’s The Fault in Our Stars so remarkable.

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White House: Companies Refusing to Cover Contraception Must Tell Employees

The White House sent a message Thursday to closely held corporations like Hobby Lobby that if they want to opt out of contraceptive coverage, they have to tell their employees.

The White House sent a message Thursday to closely held corporations like Hobby Lobby that if they want to opt out of contraceptive coverage, they have to tell their employees.

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‘Hobby Lobby,’ and a Woman’s Right to Sexual Exploration

Rihanna at the 2014 CFDA Fashion Awards

Restrictions on access to birth control are at odds with the fact that sexuality, for most of us, takes time to understand and appreciate.

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How Are People Actually Using the ‘Pullout Method’?

New research shows a number of women say they use the withdrawal method as a backup method or in combination with other contraception methods to prevent pregnancy.

New research shows a number of women say they use the withdrawal method as a backup method or in combination with other contraception methods to prevent pregnancy.

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Putting ‘Hobby Lobby’ in Context: The Erratic Career of Birth Control in the United States

The contraceptive wars started with the notorious campaign in the late 19th century of the Postmaster General Anthony Comstock, who successfully banned the spread of information about contraception under an obscenity statute.

The contraceptive wars started with the notorious campaign in the late 19th century of the Postmaster General Anthony Comstock, who successfully banned the spread of information about contraception under an obscenity statute.

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