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RHTP Agrees Condoms Do Not Cause Cancer and Has Never Stated Otherwise

On Friday, Melissa White, the CEO of an online condom retailer, attacked the findings of a study that found a small number of the condoms she sells on her website contain a chemical carcinogen called nitrosamines. In doing so, she misrepresents both our report and its conclusions.

On Friday, Melissa White, the CEO of an online condom retailer, attacked the findings of a study that found a small number of the condoms she sells on her website contain a chemical carcinogen called nitrosamines. In doing so, she misrepresents both our report and its conclusions.

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Cigarettes Cause Cancer; Condoms Don’t

A new petition calls on the FDA to “Get Carcinogens Out of Condoms.” But there is no scientific evidence linking condoms to cancer—and to claim otherwise has the potential to unravel decades of committed work focused on saving lives through encouraging condom use and education.

A new petition calls on the FDA to “Get Carcinogens Out of Condoms.” But there is no scientific evidence linking condoms to cancer—and to claim otherwise has the potential to unravel decades of committed work focused on saving lives through encouraging condom use and education.

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Condoms Are Way More Effective Than the New York Times Says They Are

Last week, New York Times columnist, Nicholas Kristof wrote a great op-ed entitled, “Politics, Teens and Birth Control,” in which he eloquently described teen pregnancy as a problem of irresponsible adults not hormone-addled teens. Unfortunately, the article includes a misleading statistic that suggests people who rely on condoms for pregnancy prevention will eventually, inevitably become pregnant.

Unfortunately, Nicholas Kristof’s great op-ed on teenage pregnancy in the New York Times last week included a misleading statistic that suggests people who rely on condoms for pregnancy prevention will eventually, inevitably become pregnant.

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How America’s Obsession With ‘Bad Birth Control’ Harms Women

Many women know more about the risks of birth control than about how the right contraceptive might improve their lives.

Many women know more about the risks of birth control than about how the right contraceptive might improve their lives.

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Pope Francis’ ‘Synod on the Family’ Raises Hope, But Fails to Deliver Change

The two-week meeting in the Vatican inspired optimism about the Catholic Church's future teachings, but in the end, it was "much ado about nothing."

The two-week meeting in the Vatican inspired optimism about the Catholic Church’s future teachings, but in the end, it was “much ado about nothing.”

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Conservatives Not Amused by NARAL Colorado Condom Shortage Ad

Conservative commentators are teeing off at an ad campaign depicting a world in which birth control is banned and condoms are in short supply.

Conservative commentators are teeing off at an ad campaign depicting a world in which birth control is banned and condoms are in short supply.

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This Week in Sex: Despite All Those Brazilians, Pubic Lice Are Still a Thing

A study has found that less pubic hair may mean fewer pubic lice—though they won't be extinct any time soon.

This week, new estimates suggest almost two million cases of chlamydia, there’s more evidence that HIV therapy cannot eradicate the virus in babies, and a study finds that less pubic hair may mean fewer pubic lice—though they won’t be extinct any time soon.

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This Week in Sex: Kansas’ Sex Toy Auction

This week, there are new recommendations for chlamydia and gonorrhea screening for young women, a secret shopper study found that young men may have a harder time buying EC over the counter, and Kansas seizes sex toys.

This week, there are new recommendations for chlamydia and gonorrhea screening for young women, a secret shopper study found that young men may have a harder time buying EC over the counter, and Kansas seizes sex toys.

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Advocates Call for Full Funding of Research on HIV and Contraception

For women in countries and communities with limited contraceptive choices and high rates of HIV, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa, a shortage of funding for the ECHO (Evidence for Contraceptive Options and HIV Outcomes) trial is an unacceptable development.

For women in countries and communities with limited contraceptive choices and high rates of HIV, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa, a shortage of funding for the ECHO (Evidence for Contraceptive Options and HIV Outcomes) trial is an unacceptable development.

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Twitter Faces Renewed Criticism for Condom Ad Policies

The controversy resurfaced last week when Washingtonian.com reported that Washington, D.C.’s Department of Health had similar trouble with posting condom ads to Twitter.

The controversy resurfaced last week when Washingtonian.com reported that Washington, D.C.’s Department of Health had similar trouble with posting condom ads to Twitter.

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