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New Diaphragm Hits U.S. Market for First Time in 50 Years

Caya, a new single-size diaphragm, gives women who can't or don't want to use hormonal methods a new birth control option.

Caya, a new single-size diaphragm, gives women who can’t or don’t want to use hormonal methods a new birth control option.

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Bolstering Modern Contraception Could Prevent 15 Million Unintended Pregnancies Every Year

New study suggests that increased use of modern contraception in low- and middle-income countries could prevent 15 million unintended pregnancies.

New study suggests that increased use of modern contraception in low- and middle-income countries could prevent 15 million unintended pregnancies.

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Legal Wrap: States Start Sessions With Rush of Anti-Abortion Measures

The legislative session kicked off in the states with a bunch of new anti-abortion bills and the first-ever conviction in Indiana of a pregnant woman for feticide for a self-induced abortion.

The legislative session kicked off in the states with a bunch of new anti-abortion bills, along with the conviction of an Indiana woman for feticide and neglect of a dependent.

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Natural Family Planning Methods Can Work, But They Take a Big Commitment

The Republican-dominated U.S. House voted 242 to 184 Wednesday to pass a bill that would ban abortion after 20 weeks nationwide, with no exceptions for a woman’s health or fetal anomalies.

The Pope drew attention to natural family planning methods when he suggested there are ways for Catholic women to limit the number of children they have without violating the Church’s teachings on contraception. But just how do these methods work? And how good are they?

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This Week in Sex: Birth Control on ‘Downton Abbey,’ and Not Much Sex in Japan

This week, the FDA warns of real Viagra in supposedly all natural supplements, a survey finds less than half of adults in Japan had sex in the last month, and we theorize about what method of contraception was available to the ladies of Downton Abbey.

This week, the FDA warns of real Viagra in supposedly all natural supplements, a survey finds less than half of adults polled in Japan had sex in the last month, and we theorize about what method of contraception was available to the ladies of Downton Abbey.

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The IUD Comeback Continues Apace

Intrauterine devices were popular until the '70s, when one model caused infertility and even death in some women. Though the new generation of IUDs are safe and effective, it has been a slow climb back to their previous rates of acceptance.

Intrauterine devices were popular until the ’70s, when one model caused infertility and even death in some women. Though the new generation of IUDs are safe and effective, it has been a slow climb back to their previous rates of acceptance.

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RHTP Agrees Condoms Do Not Cause Cancer and Has Never Stated Otherwise

On Friday, Melissa White, the CEO of an online condom retailer, attacked the findings of a study that found a small number of the condoms she sells on her website contain a chemical carcinogen called nitrosamines. In doing so, she misrepresents both our report and its conclusions.

On Friday, Melissa White, the CEO of an online condom retailer, attacked the findings of a study that found a small number of the condoms she sells on her website contain a chemical carcinogen called nitrosamines. In doing so, she misrepresents both our report and its conclusions.

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Cigarettes Cause Cancer; Condoms Don’t

A new petition calls on the FDA to “Get Carcinogens Out of Condoms.” But there is no scientific evidence linking condoms to cancer—and to claim otherwise has the potential to unravel decades of committed work focused on saving lives through encouraging condom use and education.

A new petition calls on the FDA to “Get Carcinogens Out of Condoms.” But there is no scientific evidence linking condoms to cancer—and to claim otherwise has the potential to unravel decades of committed work focused on saving lives through encouraging condom use and education.

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The Ban on Federal Funding for Needle Exchanges Puts Poor Women in Danger

Thanks to restrictive laws and limited health-care options, halting the spread of HIV and hepatitis C is often a losing battle—one that puts women substance users in particularly high danger.

Thanks to restrictive laws and limited health-care options, halting the spread of HIV and hepatitis C is often a losing battle—one that puts women substance users in particularly high danger.

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How America’s Obsession With ‘Bad Birth Control’ Harms Women

Many women know more about the risks of birth control than about how the right contraceptive might improve their lives.

Many women know more about the risks of birth control than about how the right contraceptive might improve their lives.

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