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The NRA Successfully Silences Another Obama Nominee

The Office of the Surgeon General has been vacant for almost a year, and if the NRA gets its way, it will stay vacant.

The Office of the Surgeon General has been vacant for almost a year, and if the NRA gets its way, it will stay vacant.

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Want to End Violence Against Women? Don’t Read the Washington Post

A recent Washington Post article put fault for abuse squarely on the shoulders of "women in unhealthy, unsafe relationships [who] often lack the power to demand marriage."

A recent Washington Post article put fault for abuse squarely on the shoulders of “women in unhealthy, unsafe relationships [who] often lack the power to demand marriage,” as if the only thing standing between a belt and a bruised baby is a woman who didn’t ask for a ring hard enough.

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Here Are All the ‘Privileges’ I’ve Experienced as a Survivor of Sexual Assault

George Will used his recent column to rail against efforts to curb rape on college campuses.

George Will is right. Throughout my life, my status as “survivor” has afforded me any number of privileges. For instance, the surgery that I needed a couple of years ago to fix the long-term consequences of the assault on my body was truly a privilege—it gave me the status of being temporarily unemployable.

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‘Obvious Child’ Changes the Rom-Com Game

Obvious Child, written and directed by Gillian Robsepierre, opens in theaters Friday.

Obvious Child‘s treatment of abortion as an important moment in both the development of the main character and her romantic relationship is just one of the beautiful ways the film—a raunchy joke-fest with an undeniably humanistic heart—deals with women’s choices and power.

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More Companies Speak Out About Twitter Censoring Condom, Sexual Health Info in Ads

Three additional companies have come forward to allege that Twitter censored their ads about condoms or sexual health information.

Since Wednesday morning, when RH Reality Check reported on a condom company that had its account barred from advertising on Twitter, three other companies have come forward to allege that Twitter censored their ads about condoms or sexual health information.

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New York Magazine’s Snarky, Sexist Story on Silicon Valley

Rather than lazy, people who decide to pay others to take on certain tasks may actually be cleverly investing in themselves.

In her recent—at moments, hilarious—article about the race to make millions by “appifying” the laundry business, Jessica Pressler repeats some surprising and infuriating tropes about the service economy that are, frankly, retrograde for women.

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Twitter Banned My Company From Promoting Safe Condom Use

Twitter's confusing ad policies stifle the promotion of basic, vitally important health products such as condoms.

Twitter’s confusing ad policies stifle the promotion of basic, vitally important health products such as condoms.

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Twitter Bans Company From Advertising Condoms, Citing ‘Adult or Sexual Products’ Policy (Updated)

Citing internal ad policies against "adult or sexual products and services," Twitter said that not just this ad, but Lucky Bloke's entire account, is ineligible to participate in the Twitter ads program.

While Twitter doesn’t technically prohibit condom ads, it does prohibit advertising for unspecified forms of “contraceptives,” which could keep groups from spreading information about sexual health.

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Don’t Tell Me It’s ‘Not All Men’

“Not all men” has become a meme, an in-joke among those of us who speak up in public or semi-public about feminist concerns.

In the days since I heard about Elliot Rodger’s violent spree, I’ve thought a lot about the meme “not all men”—how telling ourselves that is a requirement for continuing to exist and work in a world that increasingly requires our interactions be public, observable.

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And Still She Wrote: Remembering Maya Angelou

Maya Angelou

Dr. Maya Angelou’s life could not be contained by a single autobiography, so she wrote six, making the audacious claim that she—as a Black woman reared in the segregated South—was fully human and a worthy historical subject who needed no outside narrator to tell or validate her story.

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