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Five Things I Learned About Abortion by Checking My Assumptions at the Door

(Alex Wong/Getty Images via Colorlines)

I grew up in a conservative area and had internalized some challenging attitudes about abortion, poverty, and the death penalty—attitudes aligned with policy that worked against my (and my family’s) interests. Still, I discovered that I was ready to drop everything for a friend who needed my help. Eventually, I learned to hold this level of compassion for complete strangers, too.

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Policing African-American Motherhood From Every Angle

(zadishefreeman.com)

I often hear the question from African-American women, “What do they [the right] want? We either have too many kids or too many abortions. Which is it?” The truth is, to them, it’s both.

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Giving Thanks For Times the United States Has Fought Back Against Discrimination

For those of us living in the United States, this is a time of year for giving thanks. It is in that spirit that I have gathered a list of some of my favorite pieces of U.S. news on overcoming discrimination over the past couple of months.

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“War on Women” Increasingly Focused on Women of Color and Immigrant Women

VAWA. PRENDA. Aderholt. What do all these words (and acronyms) have in common? They represent the escalating attacks on the health and rights of women of color, and immigrant women in particular.

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Limbaugh, Fluke, and Feminism: Did We “Rush” to Conclusions About Privilege, Sex, Race, and Class?

Amidst the controversy around Rush Limbaugh and birth control coverage, there have been some missed opportunities to dive deeper into the underlying issues. What I had hoped (and continue to hope) for is space for a more nuanced discussion about privilege, sex and sexuality, and feminism.

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The Role of Community Health Centers in Reducing Cervical Cancer Inequities

Cervical cancer incidence rates vividly demonstrate inequities in our health care systems and in health outcomes. Women in rural areas, the elderly, those with less formal education, and women of color, for example, experience disproportionately high rates of cervical cancer. Meanwhile, in rural communities, uninsured white women have some of the poorest access to routine screening of any patient population.

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Groundbreaking Bill Integrates Pregnancy and Violence Prevention Strategies for Young People of Color

Today a groundbreaking bill was introduced in Congress with a first-ever policy approach that combines teen dating violence prevention and teen pregnancy prevention in communities of color.

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Louisiana Sex Workers Will No Longer Be Labeled as Sex Offenders

Louisiana’s era of forcing certain convicted sex workers to register as sex offenders appears to be over. Governor Jindall’s office announced today that he had signed into law a bill, sponsored by Louisiana State Representative Charmaine Marchand Stiaes, that effectively moves prostitution convictions back to the level of misdemeanor.

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What Women Deserve

Video and transcript of Sonya Renee Taylor performing her poem “What Women Deserve.”

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Indiana’s Anti-Choice Zealots See Poor Black Women As Collateral Damage

While Indiana’s anti-abortion Republicans (and a select few Democrats) dig in their heels, thousands of people who use Medicaid to pay for birth control, STD testing and treatment, cervical cancer screening and breast exams are at risk.

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