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How to Engage Women in Maternal Newborn and Child Health Advocacy and Services

I have been asked to suggest how we constructively engage women in Maternal Newborn and Child Health (MNCH) issues as “more than patients”, so I have come up with six suggested steps that we might all take together to achieve success.

I have been asked to suggest how we constructively engage women in Maternal Newborn and Child Health issues as “more than patients,” so I have come up with six suggested steps that we might all take together to achieve success.

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The Pillars and Possibilities of a Global Plan to Address HIV in Women and Their Children

What has worked and what needs to be improved, to ensure that the HIV and sexual and reproductive health and rights of women and girls are adequately addressed?

A Global Plan on HIV and AIDS? It has to work for women as well as for their children. Here’s how we can make that happen.

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The Cost of a Woman’s Life

I have been asked to suggest how we constructively engage women in Maternal Newborn and Child Health (MNCH) issues as “more than patients”, so I have come up with six suggested steps that we might all take together to achieve success.

Developing nations like Kenya have not experienced the overall decrease in maternal mortality enjoyed across the globe. More needs to be done to address the impact of maternal death on families and communities.

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Uganda: Pregnancy and Childbirth Mean Playing Russian Roulette With Women’s Lives

Tadej Znidarcic/The New York Times

Last March, a landmark maternal health petition was filed in Uganda, aimed at holding the government accountable for the deaths of two women in childbirth. It garnered global media attention at the time, yet five months into the process momentum has stalled. When will it be time to women to take the front seat?

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“Women Deliver 50” Honors Bright Ideas and Big Solutions

Photo:IFAD

Women Deliver, the maternal health advocacy group, today named its “Women Deliver 50,” a list not of individuals, but of solutions, focusing not on the “who” but the “how of change, and hopefully inspriing people to think bigger and crazier, and do better work.

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India’s Women and Girls Fight Second-Class Status

While pregnant women’s lack of access to basic medical facilities in India is entrenched, social attitudes around the accepted role of women as childbearers worsen maternal health in the country.

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The Fate of Our Mothers: A Maternal Health Crisis

We all arrive through pregnancy. You’d think with this kind of reputation, prioritizing maternal health might be a no-brainer for governments. What about the United States? Will our presidential candidates address the plight of mothers worldwide in the first debate?

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Two Steps Forward, Three Steps Back

Women Deliver and the Global Safe Abortion Conference proved that at least a few thousand people from among the world’s 6.6 billion are ready to shake up priorities for women’s health and end the unnecessary suffering that in much of the world endures.

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Anti-Choice Groups Deride Women Deliver

Concerned Women for America and other anti-choice groups claimed that Women Deliver focused too much on abortion — but safe and available abortion is a key part of improving maternal health.

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Shaping The Future

Where do we go from here? Young people at Women Deliver may have offered the most revolutionary road map for reducing maternal mortality rates and effecting global change.

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