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Dylan Byers and the Scourge of Privileged Defensiveness

People in positions of privilege frequently have blind spots for the work, achievements, and culture of people who are different than them.

Byers’ response to Ta-Nehisi Coates calling Melissa Harris-Perry “America’s foremost public intellectual” illustrates an important problem: People in positions of privilege frequently have blind spots for the work, achievements, and culture of people who are different than them.

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Why I Visit Sites of Slavery

Tryon Palace, a colonial governor’s residence in New Bern, North Carolina.

Erasing plantations from the landscape or simply lambasting them doesn’t get rid of slavery; it just rids us of its most uncomfortable and most visible symbols.

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Ani DiFranco’s Epic Fail: Reflections on Nottoway Plantation

America's history of racialized slavery distilled the essence of patriarchy, and formed the roots of American rape culture. So why do famous white feminists fail to get it?

America’s history of racialized slavery distilled the essence of patriarchy, and formed the roots of American rape culture. So why do famous white feminists fail to get it?

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A True Ally Rejects Racial Hierarchy, and Other Tips From Feminists of Color

Feminism needs to center the experiences of all women of color in the movement. As a starting point, here are some suggestions from several smart women.

Feminism needs to center the experiences of all women of color in the movement. As a starting point, here are some suggestions from several smart women.

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‘Follow the Leader’ Examines Conservatism, White Boys, and Political Entitlement (Oh My!)

In this screenshot from 'Follow the Leader,' Ben (middle) prays with Cuccinelli (right) and other staff over a meal at a restaurant.

While respectful and serious in the treatment of its subjects, Follow the Leader is a rollicking romp through patriarchy. It is entertaining, illuminating, and a springboard for conversations beneficial to those of us who would prefer to see more than only conservative white boys angling for the oval office.

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National Right to Life Thinks Texas Woman Denied an Abortion Is ‘Hilarious’

What's funny about forced pregnancy?

What’s funny about forced pregnancy?

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‘Orange Is the New Black,’ and How We Talk About Race and Identity

From left to right: Black Cindy (Adrienne C. Moore), Poussey Washington (Samira Wiley), and Piper Chapman (Taylor Schilling).

OITNB isn’t perfect in its handling of race, class, and gender, but the series does get a lot right about the conversations people of color and white folks have amongst themselves and with each other, and how different identities and experiences shape those interactions.

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#IntersectionalityIsForTwitter: How to Be a True Ally

Our movements have all three of these choices: We can refuse to work with the oppressed people who voiced their grievances, we could ignore their grievances, or we could work to address them.

A discussion of several hashtags that have been making their way around Twitter over the past week: #SolidarityIsForWhiteWomen, #BlackPowerIsForBlackMen, and #F*ckCisPeople.

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‘Here Is Your Brain on Race’: Democrats Engage in Hearing on Race and Justice

In her testimony, Maya Wiley (above) sought to draw a distinction between overtly racist attitudes and the biases, both conscious and unconscious, that determine the shapes of institutions, and limitations to access experienced by people of color.

Exploring overt racism, unconscious bias, and the ravages of inequality, Democratic lawmakers sought solutions in the wake of the Trayvon Martin verdict.

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Women of Color and Feminism: A History Lesson and Way Forward

It is not the responsibility of feminists of color to tell white feminists we exist and have been a part of the feminist movement for a long time.

It is not the responsibility of feminists of color to tell white feminists we exist and have been a part of the feminist movement for a long time. When feminists of color or Black feminists—or whatever moniker they choose—are passed over and ignored, it is an insult, intentional or not.

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