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Could New Steubenville Indictments Send a Message to Communities About Dealing With Rape?

Texas' omnibus anti-abortion law goes on trial again this morning in New Orleans.

Four more adults were indicted Monday for what they did—or didn’t do—after the rape of a 16-year-old girl last August. It will be interesting to see if going after the adults who facilitate these situations will be the lesson that communities need to start paying attention to our nation’s rape problem.

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We Have a Rape Problem. First Step: We Have to Admit It.

Too many boys think it is OK to have sex with girls who have not consented. They think it is OK to have sex with girls who are so drunk they could not possibly consent. They think it is OK to have sex with girls who are completely unconscious. And we let them do it. It's time to admit we have a problem.

Too many boys think it is OK to have sex with girls who have not consented. They think it is OK to have sex with girls who are so drunk they could not possibly consent. They think it is OK to have sex with girls who are completely unconscious. And we let them do it. It’s time to admit we have a problem.

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From Big Dan’s to Steubenville: A Generation Later, Media Coverage of Rape Still Awful

Striking parallels between a rape case from exactly thirty years ago and Steubenville make for a good opportunity to assess how much reporting on rape has improved in the span of one generation.

Striking parallels between a rape case from almost exactly thirty years ago and the Steubenville case make for a good opportunity to assess how reporting on rape has changed—or not.

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As Steubenville Rape Trial Opens, Victim-Blaming Begins in Court of Law and Public Opinion

The Supreme Court could decide as early as Thursday whether its next term will include a major abortion-rights case.

Trial starts in the case charging two high school football players with rape, and not surprisingly, the defense is arguing consent.

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