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Washington Policy Disclosures Provide Little Clarity on Reproductive Health-Care Access at Hospitals

As required by a new state mandate, most hospitals in Washington have submitted their policies on patients’ access to a variety of health-care options. However, the policies vary significantly in format, information provided, and availability of access for people seeking reproductive health care.

As required by a new state mandate, most hospitals in Washington have submitted their policies on patients’ access to a variety of health-care options. However, the policies vary significantly in format, information provided, and availability of access for people seeking reproductive health care.

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Washington Hospitals Miss Deadline to Submit Reproductive and End-of-Life Care Policies

The new rules were ordered by Gov. Jay Inslee in response to a wave of hospital mergers in which Catholic hospital associations have joined with secular hospitals, raising concerns about reproductive health-care policies.

The new rules were ordered by Gov. Jay Inslee in response to a wave of hospital mergers in which Catholic hospital associations have joined with secular hospitals, raising concerns about reproductive health-care policies.

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Washington State Rule Would Require Hospitals to Disclose Reproductive Health-Care Services

A bill that would have banned telemedicine abortions died in the Iowa legislature Friday after failing to meet a legislative deadline.

New rules proposed by the Washington health department would require hospitals to disclose what reproductive health-care and end-of-life services they provide. Behind the push are concerns about the ethical religious directives of religiously affiliated hospitals.

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Self-Certification and the Contraceptive Coverage Rule: What Does it Mean for an Institution to “Hold Itself Out as Religious?”

Potential employees, students, and patients--as well as taxpayers generally--deserve to know who they are dealing with.

Some religiously-affiliated institutions characterize themselves as “secular” when recruiting or seeking public funding but “church-controlled” when demanding exemptions from the law, such as the birth control benefit. Potential employees, students, and patients—as well as taxpayers generally—deserve to know who they are dealing with.

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