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The Price of Our Blood: Why Ferguson Is a Reproductive Justice Issue

At a rally staged by Peoples Power Assembly in New York, demonstrators seek justice for Eric Garner, Michael Brown, and other Black people killed by police.

There can be no reproductive justice for all until the state-sanctioned murder of Black youth in this country is addressed.

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Students Walk Out With Their Hands Up to Protest Michael Brown Shooting

A Syracuse University student at a Monday #HandsUpWalkOut event on the steps of Hendricks Chapel.

Hundreds of students at around ten colleges walked out of class in solidarity on Monday, expressing their anger at the lack of justice for Brown and the other young people of color killed in police shootings.

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Legal Wrap: More Changes to Contraception Accommodation Means More Lawsuits

The Obama administration announced another change to the religious accommodation to the birth control benefit, and predictably conservatives hate it.

The Obama administration announced another change to the religious accommodation to the birth control benefit, and predictably conservatives hate it.

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Ferguson Highlights How State and Local Governments Get So Corrupt

A demonstrator in Ferguson holds a sign after Police Chief Thomas Jackson names the officer who shot Michael Brown.

Among other things, Ferguson shows us that systemic racial injustice persists, often with “states’ rights” or “local rights” as justification.

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Want Peace? Killing Black People Needs To Be Treated as a Crime

Michael Brown, 18, who was killed by a police officer in broad daylight on August 9 in Ferguson, Missouri.

Only when it is considered, in practice, a serious crime to kill a Black person will it be possible to have peace in the United States.

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It’s Not Just Ferguson: Austin’s Problem With Police Brutality

While national attention is focused on the police shooting of unarmed teenager Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, researchers and advocates in different cities across the country are pointing out the obvious—this problem is larger than one town.

While national attention is focused on the police shooting of unarmed teenager Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, researchers and advocates in different cities across the country are pointing out the obvious—this problem is larger than one town.

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Legal Wrap: Police Brutality Is a Reproductive Justice Issue

Police in riot gear on the streets of Ferguson, Missouri, following the fatal police shooting of Michael Brown, an unarmed teenager, on Saturday, August 9.

The tragic shooting death of an unarmed Missouri teenager by a police officer is a wake-up call for advocates that police brutality is a reproductive justice issue.

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Peace, Organizing, and Outrage Mark ‘National Moment of Silence’ Vigils

Demonstrators gather at Meridian Hill Park (also known as Malcolm X Park) for a National Moment of Silence vigil in Washington, D.C.

Nationwide vigils for Michael Brown and other victims of police violence were a time for peaceful mourning, but not without moments of outrage.

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Obama Responds to Ferguson Unrest as Advocates Decry Police Violence (Updated)

Obama said that there is no excuse for violence against police or for vandalism and looting, but that there is also no excuse for using excessive force against peaceful protesters who are exercising their First Amendment rights.

Obama said that there is no excuse for violence against police or for vandalism and looting, but that there is also no excuse for using excessive force against peaceful protesters who are exercising their First Amendment rights.

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Beyond Stop and Frisk: Communities Organize for Deeper Reforms

Police in Hawaii successfully lobbied house lawmakers to leave in place a decades-old provision that allows officers to have sex with prostitutes, arguing that the measure is necessary for them to catch individuals who are breaking the law. Critics, however, call it an invitation for misconduct.

A recent court decision against stop and frisk speaks specifically to racial profiling, but we know that other kinds of profiling—based on gender, sexual orientation, economic status, and other characteristics—are often used by police.

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