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In the Wake of Michael Brown’s Death, a Weekend of Resistance in Ferguson

Community members and activists over the next month are gathering once again to demand justice for Brown, the victims of police violence nationwide, and the subsequent police crackdown on residents in Ferguson, Missouri.

Community members and activists over the next month are gathering once again to demand justice for Brown, the victims of police violence nationwide, and the subsequent police crackdown on residents in Ferguson, Missouri.

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When It Comes to Police Brutality, Seeing Isn’t Always Believing

A recent police shooting in South Carolina illustrates the importance of video when it comes to issues of race and policing. It also reminds us of the complications inherent in crime-related imagery—especially regarding how much people only see what they want to believe.

A recent police shooting in South Carolina illustrates the importance of video when it comes to issues of race and policing. It also reminds us, however, that video alone is not enough to overcome or combat the violence resulting from implicit bias.

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Police Brutality and Accountability: When Liberals Forget to Check Their Biases

Stated simply, most Americans have an irrational belief that Black men are dangerous, and this bias is especially prevalent among white Americans, including most white liberals and progressives.

Stated simply, most Americans have an irrational belief that Black men are dangerous, and this bias is especially prevalent among white Americans, including most white liberals and progressives.

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The Violence Happening in Ferguson Is More Than Physical

A man holds his hands up after Ferguson Police Chief Thomas Jackson named the officer who shot Michael Brown last month.

Many people assume that the term “violence” only refers to physically painful encounters. But I want to explore what multiple forms of violence—physical, emotional, bureaucratic, and spiritual—do to a group of people when they simultaneously converge on a community.

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Groups Push President Obama for Accountability in Ferguson

Advocates gather in front of the White House with boxes full of petition signatures calling for justice for Michael Brown.

Advocates are calling on President Obama and the Department of Justice for full accountability for the death Michael Brown, the unarmed Black teen shot by police in Ferguson, Missouri, and for systemic changes to discriminatory police practices nationwide.

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The Price of Our Blood: Why Ferguson Is a Reproductive Justice Issue

Community members and activists over the next month are gathering once again to demand justice for Brown, the victims of police violence nationwide, and the subsequent police crackdown on residents in Ferguson, Missouri.

There can be no reproductive justice for all until the state-sanctioned murder of Black youth in this country is addressed.

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Want Peace? Killing Black People Needs To Be Treated as a Crime

Michael Brown, 18, who was killed by a police officer in broad daylight on August 9 in Ferguson, Missouri.

Only when it is considered, in practice, a serious crime to kill a Black person will it be possible to have peace in the United States.

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Racial Injustice: The Case for Prosecuting Buyers as Sex Traffickers

Those of us fighting trafficking as part of a broader human rights movement must recognize that failing to advocate for the use of these laws to punish both buyers and sellers serves to perpetuate very serious racial disparities in who we are deeming culpable and who we are criminalizing for trafficking.

Those of us fighting trafficking as part of a broader human rights movement must recognize that failing to advocate for the use of these laws to punish both buyers and sellers serves to perpetuate very serious racial disparities in who we are deeming culpable and who we are criminalizing for trafficking.

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And Still She Wrote: Remembering Maya Angelou

Maya Angelou

Dr. Maya Angelou’s life could not be contained by a single autobiography, so she wrote six, making the audacious claim that she—as a Black woman reared in the segregated South—was fully human and a worthy historical subject who needed no outside narrator to tell or validate her story.

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Beyond Stop and Frisk: Communities Organize for Deeper Reforms

Police in Hawaii successfully lobbied house lawmakers to leave in place a decades-old provision that allows officers to have sex with prostitutes, arguing that the measure is necessary for them to catch individuals who are breaking the law. Critics, however, call it an invitation for misconduct.

A recent court decision against stop and frisk speaks specifically to racial profiling, but we know that other kinds of profiling—based on gender, sexual orientation, economic status, and other characteristics—are often used by police.

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