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Porn Stars and Prisoners: California Considers Measures to Expand Condom Use

condoms

Two bills currently in the California legislature are designed to expand condom use for two very different populations.

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New Paper Series Explores Reproductive Justice Issues, Including What Happens to Pregnant Women in Prison

The treatment of pregnant women in prison exposes problems with mass imprisonment in the United States.

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Now is the Time to Stop Shackling Pregnant Women in California

The California Legislature unanimously passed a bill to protect pregnant women from shackling; last-minute lobbying puts this important bill at risk.

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How Long Must Californians Wait to Safeguard Pregnant Women’s Rights in Prison?

For the second session in a row, the California Legislature has unanimously passed a bill to prohibit the shackling of pregnant incarcerated women. Will the Governor sign it into law?

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Two More Victories against Inhumane Treatment of Imprisoned Women

Two victories in one day: A federal jury in Tennessee affirms that shackling during labor violates women’s rights, and the Virginia Department of Corrections announces that it will no longer engage in the practice.

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Federal Court Condemns Shackling, Vindicates Woman

A new federal court decision adds weight to the campaign to ban the shackling of pregnant women.

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Will the Justice Department Stand Up for Women Raped in Prison?

As the federal government prepares to implement a law about sexual assault in prison, will it ensure women’s access to reproductive health care?

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Family Pleads for Release from Prison of Dying HIV-Positive Woman

An HIV-positive woman in Florida serving a five-year prison sentence for spitting on a police officer is dying from cancer and has one month to live. Her family is pleading for her release so she can die at home.

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Imagine Giving Birth While Shackled to a Bedpost

More women—two-thirds of whom are mothers—are behind bars today than at any other point in U.S. history.  But federal and state laws and regulations fail to ensure humane treatment of pregnant women and mothers.

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Responding to the Arrests of Pregnant Women in Alabama

Amanda K. was six months pregnant and went into early labor with a prolapsed umbilical cord. She went to a local hospital for care where she underwent emergency surgery, but unfortunately her son soon died. But, rather than providing the support and compassionate care she and her family needed, the hospital drug tested her. The positive result was used as a basis for reporting her to the police and having her arrested for the crime of “chemical endangerment” of a child.

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