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Names Do Hurt: The Case Against Using Derogatory Language to Describe People in Prison

Too often, news stories about people in prison or jail use dehumanizing language to describe those under government control. While this coverage draws attention to widespread abuses in the criminal justice system, it frequently undercuts the humanity of the people featured with derogatory phrases.

Too often, news stories about people in prison or jail use dehumanizing language to describe those under government control. The term “inmate” is the most pervasive of these words; it is widely used by judges, prison and jail officials and staff, and the media.

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Lawsuit: Gay Inmates Placed in Solitary Confinement, Subject to Discrimination

Gay, bisexual, and transgender inmates in California filed a class action lawsuit last week against a county and its sheriff, alleging that they are kept in a segregated ward called an “Alternative Lifestyle Tank,” essentially keeping them in solitary confinement and subjecting them to regular discrimination and harassment.

Gay, bisexual, and transgender inmates in California filed a class action lawsuit last week against a county and its sheriff, alleging that they are kept in a segregated ward called an “Alternative Lifestyle Tank,” essentially keeping them in solitary confinement and subjecting them to regular discrimination and harassment.

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Michigan Corrections Officials Push Change to Policies on HIV-Positive Prisoners

A Michigan Department of Corrections official confirms that the department is seeking changes to a controversial policy barring HIV-positive prisoners from working in food service jobs.

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Dept. of Civil Rights: Michigan’s Ban on HIV-Positive Inmates Working in Food Service Violates Law

The Michigan Department of Corrections has prevented HIV-infected prisoners from working in food service positions since at least 1999. But the Michigan Department of Civil Rights argues that the policy violates non-discrimination statutes.

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