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A Call to Action: Integrate Family Planning and HIV Services to Save Women’s Lives

All photos courtesy of Marie Stopes International.

In 2012, three years before the 2015 deadline the world set for itself to reduce preventable maternal deaths and new HIV infections, we must act more boldly than we have up until now. The global health community must work to bring family planning and HIV services together – and quickly – to save women’s lives.

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The Cancerous Politics and Ideology of the Susan G. Komen Foundation

This week it became clear there are things more important to the Susan G. Komen Foundation–the fundraising giant that each year during breast cancer awareness month virtually swathes the United States in pink, a la Christo–than ensuring women are able to access exams for early detection of breast cancer.  In a word: Politics.

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Cervical Cancer is Preventable. Let’s Make it a Global Priority

CIES clinic in Bolivia where 400,000 health services are provided annually. Photograph courtesy of IPPF/WHR.

Diseases such as diabetes and cancer cause tens of millions of deaths each year, many of which are premature. Once the burden of rich countries, these non-communicable diseases are increasingly affecting individuals in low- and middle-income countries where they impose heavy burdens on already fragile health systems. Among the most deadly—and preventable—of these diseases is cervical cancer.

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On World AIDS Day, A Health Hut In Senegal Reveals What’s Possible

Senegal provides a fascinating case study in how to work simultaneously to prevent the spread of HIV and meet the family planning needs of women and families. The country’s successes also reveal why now, more than ever, U.S. investments in family planning are critical to empowering women, reducing poverty, reducing transmission of HIV and deaths from AIDS, and saving lives.

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Do New Health Law Mandates Threaten Conscience Rights and Access to Care?

I firmly believe the requirements under the Affordable Care Act, and the slate of regulations being created to implement it, infringe on no one’s conscience, demand no one change her or his religious beliefs, discriminate against no man or woman, put no additional economic burden on the poor, interfere with no one’s medical decisions, compromise no one’s health — that is, if you consider the law without refusal clauses.

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The 96 Percent Campaign: How Obama Can Help End the AIDS Crisis

President Obama has repeatedly stressed his administration’s commitment to science as one way to distinguish his leadership from that of his predecessor.  Right now that commitment is being put to the test on HIV and AIDS: if the President could do more to  end the crisis, would he?

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HPV Education, Prevention & Support: Innovative Efforts Reach Young People and Older Adults

Tamika and Friends is a national organization whose mission is to raise awareness about cervical cancer and its link to HPV through education and prevention.

 

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HHS Adopts IOM Recommendations on Reproductive Health Care; Exempts “Religious Employers” From Birth Control Coverage

The Department of Health and Human Services has adopted guidelines for insurance coverage on women’s preventive health services that include all the recommendations recently made by the Institute of Medicine and require new health insurance plans to cover women’s preventive services such as well-woman visits, breastfeeding support, domestic violence screening, and contraception without charging a co-payment, co-insurance or a deductible.

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What’s At Stake in How HHS Handles the IOM Report?

What’s at stake in the HHS decision around the IOM recommendations on contraception?  First, the health and rights of women who will benefit from easier access to contraception. And second, the IOM’s action draws attention to the extent to which contraception  has become yet another front in the nation’s unending culture war.

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Promise Rings and Nuvarings: Why I Needed Contraception Without Co-Pays

When my mom knew my birth control was not only preventing “changes in my mood” but also the chance that I could get pregnant, she stopped paying for my birth control; she said, “I am not supporting your habit.”

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