· · · · · 

Research Shows Philadelphia Failing UN Maternal and Infant Health Goals

Increasing support for family policy among lawmakers is encouraging—but what about the commitment of the private sector?

Philadelphia’s dire performance can be attributed to the collision of two major factors: widespread, profound poverty and a sharp reduction in the number of hospitals providing maternity care.

· · · · · 

Cutting Food Stamps Is Just Bad Policy

Even as a string of recent studies reveal the damaging effect of poverty on children, both Democrats and Republicans seek to cut food stamps, which have been shown to help alleviate poverty.

Even as a string of recent studies reveal the damaging effect of poverty on children, both Democrats and Republicans seek to cut food stamps, which have been shown to help alleviate poverty.

· · · · · 

Detroit Workers Deserve Better Than Bankruptcy

Detroit's argument that the city is insolvent and thus needs to “save” on its pension liabilities is purely an expression of political priorities—priorities that do not include valuing workers.

Detroit’s argument that the city is insolvent and thus needs to “save” on its pension liabilities is purely an expression of political priorities—priorities that do not include valuing workers.

· · · · · 

Why Abortion Funds Are Needed, Even in Pro-Choice States

Abortion funds are critical because they help bridge the gap left by the Hyde Amendment and enable access to abortion for those who are financially denied their right to choose.

Abortion funds are critical because they help bridge the gap left by the Hyde Amendment and enable access to abortion for those who are financially denied their right to choose.

· · · · · 

Repealing Welfare Family Cap Laws a Common Goal for Some Pro- and Anti-Choice Groups

Welfare reform family caps punish the poor for having children. Repealing such laws sometimes creates common ground for pro-choice and "pro-life" groups.

Welfare reform family caps punish the poor for having children. Repealing such laws sometimes creates common ground for pro-choice and “pro-life” groups.

· · · · · 

Pat Robertson Supports Birth Control! But Bill O’Reilly Wants Jay Z to Preach Abstinence

Conservative talking heads Pat Robertson (left) and Bill O'Reilly (right) each took on the complicated subject of birth control and poverty this week.

Conservative talking heads Pat Robertson and Bill O’Reilly each took on the complicated subject of birth control and poverty last week.

· · · · · 

The Bishops Do Not Speak for All Catholics

The U.S. Catholic bishops want to be known as the champions of the poor and struggling. But they're happy to block services to the needy to further their anti-contraception agenda.

I do not believe that people—especially Catholics—in either the Philippines or Ireland want our elected officials to bend a knee to the will of the bishops when it comes to reproductive health.

· · · · · 

How Can a ‘Pro-Life’ Legislator Fight to Gut SNAP?

The attack against SNAP failed, but it is perhaps the latest example of why a legislator’s claim to be "pro-life" simply cannot hold water when he also views critical programs that aid children as expendable.

The House sponsor of the recently failed Farm Bill has a deep commitment to fetuses. His commitment to children? Not so much.

· · · · · 

One Lesson From Texas: Legal Abortion Means Nothing Without Access

The legal right to an abortion means nothing to a person who can’t get to the clinic, the person who can’t speak the language spoken in the clinic, the person who doesn’t have enough money to pay for it, the person who doesn’t have the documentation required.

Wendy Davis and SB 5’s opponents know: The legal right to an abortion means nothing to the person who can’t get to a clinic, the person who can’t speak the language spoken in a clinic, the person who doesn’t have enough money to pay for an abortion, and the person who doesn’t have the required documentation.

· · · · · 

Evidence-Based Advocacy: Poverty, Adoption, and Inequality in Perspective

How do the intersections between adoption, poverty, race, and class play out today? 

· · · · ·