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Study: Rates of Cervical Cancer in the United States Higher Than Previously Thought

About 12,000 women in the United States get cervical cancer each year.

About 12,000 women in the United States get cervical cancer each year. While this number has not gone up, researchers have recalculated the rate of cervical cancer in the country and found that it’s higher than we thought, with some groups at much higher risk than previously believed.

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This Week in Sex: New York Takes on Condoms-as-Evidence, and the FDA Approves New Use for HPV Test

New York state lawmakers are taking on the policy of using condoms as evidence of prostitution.

This week, New York state lawmakers took on a policy of using condoms as evidence of prostitution, a plan to sell condoms in middle and high schools in China met some skepticism, and the FDA approved a panel suggestion about HPV test. Plus, happy Masturbation Month!

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Cervical Cancer and Women of Color: What Will it Take to Get to Zero?

It is no secret that women of color—specifically Black and Latina women—are at greatest risk of cervical cancer. Ending cervical cancer will be no easy task. Great strides can be made by taking a multi-level approach to the problem, which includes expanding knowledge, empowering Black women to make their health a priority, and continued advocacy efforts.

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Cervical Cancer-Free America?

January is National Cervical Cancer Awareness Month. The number of deaths from cervical cancer in the United States has declined dramatically. Yet 4,000 women still die each year from a mostly preventable disease. What’s going on?

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