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Sexual Liberation Is for White Women, According to ‘Orange Is the New Black’

The Netflix series has been praised by many as being "revolutionary" in its depictions of womanhood, but the show fails to offer its Black characters sexual liberation that is typically only associated with white characters.

The Netflix series has been praised by many as being “revolutionary” in its depictions of womanhood, but the show fails to offer its Black characters the sexual liberation that is typically only associated with white characters.

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Dilemma Faced in ‘Orange Is the New Black’ All Too Real for Mothers Behind Bars

In the newly released season of Orange Is the New Black, Daya Diaz must grapple with whether she should give her baby up for adoption or have the newborn go into foster care as she finishes her 36-month sentence. Diaz's plight reflects the real-life situation of incarcerated mothers around the country.

In the newly released season of Orange Is the New Black, Daya Diaz must grapple with whether she should give her baby up for adoption or have the newborn go into foster care as she finishes her 36-month sentence. Diaz’s plight reflects the real-life situation of incarcerated mothers around the country.

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‘Orange Is the New Black,’ and How We Talk About Race and Identity

From left to right: Black Cindy (Adrienne C. Moore), Poussey Washington (Samira Wiley), and Piper Chapman (Taylor Schilling).

OITNB isn’t perfect in its handling of race, class, and gender, but the series does get a lot right about the conversations people of color and white folks have amongst themselves and with each other, and how different identities and experiences shape those interactions.

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