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Supreme Court Asked to Review NYC Law Regulating Crisis Pregnancy Centers

A conservative legal advocacy organization has asked the Roberts Court to review a federal appeals court decision reinstating portions of New York City's truth-in-advertising law regulating crisis pregnancy centers.

A conservative legal advocacy organization has asked the Roberts Court to review a federal appeals court decision reinstating portions of New York City’s truth-in-advertising law regulating crisis pregnancy centers.

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Food Stamp Allocations Should Take Into Account Where You Live

The federal poverty threshold, which dictates eligibility of most public benefits, including food stamps, is flawed in that it does not account for cost of living.

The federal poverty guidelines, which dictate eligibility of most public benefits, including food stamps, is flawed in that it does not account for variances in cost of living.

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The Work Behind ‘Roe v. Wade’ Continues

We must do more than ensure the right to reproductive health care is legal. We must ensure it’s available and accessible in every way.

We must do more than ensure the right to reproductive health care is legal. We must ensure it’s available and accessible in every way.

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Federal Appeals Court Reinstates Portion of NYC Law Regulating Crisis Pregnancy Centers

The 2-1 ruling requires crisis pregnancy centers disclose whether they have licensed medical providers at their facilities.

The 2-1 ruling requires crisis pregnancy centers to disclose whether they have licensed medical providers at their facilities.

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‘16 and Pregnant’ May Work, But We Could Do So Much Better

Stop appropriating my family and my peers for your mission and realize you are not only failing teenage families but you are also failing non parent teens through exploitive methods.

Researchers and the general public may be unable to agree on teen pregnancy shows’ contributions to society, but what we all can agree on is that these MTV shows present tired tropes about teen moms that are harmful for young girls.

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Beyond Stop and Frisk: Communities Organize for Deeper Reforms

Police in Hawaii successfully lobbied house lawmakers to leave in place a decades-old provision that allows officers to have sex with prostitutes, arguing that the measure is necessary for them to catch individuals who are breaking the law. Critics, however, call it an invitation for misconduct.

A recent court decision against stop and frisk speaks specifically to racial profiling, but we know that other kinds of profiling—based on gender, sexual orientation, economic status, and other characteristics—are often used by police.

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Sexual Health Roundup: Big Apple Edition

In this week's sexual health roundup, we take a close look at New York City.

In this week’s sexual health roundup, we take a close look at New York City: a new app for teens, a little-known regulation that prevents schools from teaching sex ed in buildings owned by the Catholic Church, and a new report that finds huge reproductive health disparities across the five boroughs.

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‘We Have a Deal’: Paid Sick Days Will Be Law in NYC

At a press conference that at times became a raucous rally—members of Make the Road New York and New York Communities for Change could be heard chanting “Si se pudo!” (yes we could), for example—Quinn and Gale Brewer, the bill's sponsor, addressed the crowd and provided details of the bill.

City Council Speaker Christine Quinn gave in to relentless pressure from unions, community groups, and the Working Families Party and agreed to pass a bill that will ensure that almost no New Yorker can be fired for taking a day off due to illness.

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New York City Council Holds Paid Sick Days Hearing, But Mayoral Hopeful Quinn Barely Shows

sick woman in bed

Christine Quinn’s silence was notable because she is widely perceived to be the only obstacle standing between the bill and its passage.

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I Was a Teen Mom and The NYC Teen Pregnancy Ads Miss the Point

Instead of society saying "Didn't you see the ads? Why didn't you listen? It's all your fault," they should be wondering why decades of scary campaigns haven't worked and start providing support rather than shame.

The Bloomberg Administration and NYC’s Human Resources Administration have launched a campaign whose purpose seems to be shaming and stigmatizing teen mothers. But politicians and older generations are the ones who should be ashamed for their failures to provide meaningful sexual health education or to address the social conditions that lead to teen pregnancy.

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