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In Our Own Hands: What U.S. Women Can Learn from Self-Use of Medication Abortion Worldwide

Attorneys for Planned Parenthood Federation of America and the Center for Reproductive Rights have challenged a new state regulation they argue threatens to make medication abortion unavailable in the state.

There is much we can learn from our sisters in the Global South who, rather than trying to gain access to services that all too often do not exist or fail to treat them well, are obtaining pills to induce abortion and taking them at home without seeing a health provider.

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The Politics of Abortion in Latin America

Latin America is home to five of the seven countries in the world in which abortion is banned in all instances, even when the life of the woman is at risk.

Latin America is home to five of the seven countries in the world in which abortion is banned in all instances, even when the life of the woman is at risk. Here’s why.

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How Many Amalias, Karinas, and Savitas Must There Be? Las Savitas de Centroamérica

Here in Central America, women are denied life-saving treatment every day. Women with life-threatening illnesses are denied treatment because to do so might harm their pregnancy—just the same explanation that Savita’s husband received from their doctors in Galway.  [This article is published in both English and Spanish.]

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Weekly Pulse: Obama to Promote Health Plan at Summit

Today, President Obama will hold a televised health care summit on his recently released plan for health reform, a last-ditch attempt to get Republicans to offer ideas for reform. In fact, he’s hoping to give the GOP enough rope to hang itself.

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Nicaraguan Groups Call on International Community for Help in Case of Pregnant Woman Denied Cancer Treatment

Women’s groups in Nicaragua are calling on the international community to take action on the case of Amelia (an alias, also sometimes spelled Amalia), the pregnant Nicaraguan woman now being denied a therapeutic abortion and effective cancer treatment to save her life.

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Pregnant Nicaraguan Woman Denied Treatment for Metastatic Cancer

Amalia (an alias), a 27-year old Nicaraguan woman with a 10-year-old daughter, has been diagnosed with metastatic cancer. She is in the hospital and could be treated, but for one thing: She is also pregnant and therefore her life is meaningless.

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The Nicaraguan Abortion Ban Tortures Women

When women don’t have access to abortion services, their lives are in jeopardy.  This truth has been abundantly clear in Nicaragua.

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Nicaraguan Laws Increase Maternal Mortality

According to a report today from Feministing, Amnesty International has
started a campaign to repeal the anti-abortion laws in Nicaragua, which
were enacted one year ago—laws that ban abortion in every single case,
regardless of the state of the mother or the fetus’s health, mandating
prison sentences for women who request them and doctors who perform
them.

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Nicaragua: Working for Safety Despite Abortion Ban

After more than a hundred years of legally allowing women access to a therapeutic abortion, in October 2006 the Nicaraguan National Assembly banned this procedure in all circumstances. Now women’s health groups are working to mitigate the damage.

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Nicaraguan Assembly Recriminalizes All Abortion

Last Thursday, the Nicaraguan National Assembly voted 66-3 to recriminalize therapeutic abortion during an overhaul of the Nicaraguan penal code, again choosing unvarnished political opportunism over accepted medical consensus and concern for women’s health.

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