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HIV Found in Baby Who Was Previously Thought ‘Cured’ of the Virus

Doctors were devastated to announce last week that their patient, an almost 4-year-old girl was once thought "cured" of HIV,  was found to have detectable viral loads and lowered T-cell counts.

Doctors were devastated to announce last week that their patient, an almost 4-year-old girl was once thought “cured” of HIV, was found to have detectable viral loads and lowered T-cell counts.

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Another Case Raises Hopes About Early Treatment for HIV-Positive Babies

Physicians in California believe that they have cleared HIV from a 9-month-old born with the virus.

Doctors in California believe that they have cleared HIV from the blood of a nine-month-old who seems to have been born with the virus. Though they can’t call it a “cure” or even say she is in remission because she continues to take medication, her doctors believe she has “sero-reverted to HIV-negative.”

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This Week in Sex: Chlamydia-Cancer Link, HIV Rates in Africa, and Disney Does Same-Sex Parenting

A new study may explain why there's a link between chlamydia (pictured above) and an increased risk of cervical cancer.

This week, a new study showed a possible reason for the link between chlamydia and cervical cancer, UNAIDS found that seven African countries have reduced new HIV infection rates in children, and a Disney Channel show is set to feature a pre-schooler with two moms.

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Should We Call it a ‘Cure’? The Mississippi Child Who’s No Longer HIV-Positive

HIV-infected T cell.

Do we do more harm than good when we bandy about the word “cure” in a case like this?

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Lest We Forget About the 33 Million…

Recent advances in HIV prevention promise to catalyze the global effort to reverse the spread of HIV. But we also must ensure that the estimated 33 million already living with the virus have access to quality sexual and reproductive health services.

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India to Impose Mandatory HIV Testing of Pregnant Women?

A news report indicates that India, a country in which more women die during pregnancy and childbirth than any other country in the world, and whose government has persistently neglected women’s health and rights, has apparently now decided to impose mandatory testing of pregnant women to ensure an “AIDS-free generation.”

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Leading Voices in Reproductive Health Honor Dr. Allan Rosenfield’s Life and Legacy

Reproductive and sexual health advocates around the world mourn the loss of Dr. Allan Rosenfield, former dean of Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health and a pioneer in the field of maternal health, family planning, and HIV/AIDS.

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