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First Woman Arrested Under Tennessee Pregnancy Criminalization Law, for a Drug Not Covered Under the Law

Mallory Loyola was arrested Tuesday under a new Tennessee law that criminalizes mothers whose babies are exposed to certain illegal drugs in utero.

The law specifically criminalizes “the illegal use of a narcotic drug while pregnant, if [a woman's] child is born addicted to or harmed by the narcotic drug.” But Mallory Loyola was arrested Tuesday for exposing her child to amphetamine, which is not a narcotic.

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Minnesota Law Protects Incarcerated Pregnant Women From Shackling, Provides Doulas

Among other things, the new law requires that inmates have access to mental health assessments and treatment during pregnancy and postpartum, and mandates that correctional facilities offer pregnancy and STD tests to inmates.

Among other things, the new law requires that inmates have access to mental health assessments and treatment during pregnancy and postpartum, and mandates that correctional facilities offer pregnancy and STD tests to inmates.

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‘Born in the Wild’? The Problems With Lifetime’s New Reality Show

Born in the Wild will follow birthing women who eschew hospitals and doctors for babbling brooks and fields of wildflowers.

Women should be free to choose their childbirth experience, whether it be in a hospital or in the woods. But I fear that Born in the Wild will be a disingenuous attempt to suggest that modern medicine ruined childbirth.

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Tennessee’s Pregnancy Criminalization Law Will Hit Black Women the Hardest

SB 1391 may not target Black women specifically, but history tells us that laws that do not specifically target people of color nevertheless tend to disparately affect people of color.

SB 1391 may not target Black women specifically, but history tells us that laws that do not specifically target people of color nevertheless tend to disparately affect people of color.

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Panel Recommends Low-Dose Aspirin Regimen for Women at Risk of Preeclampsia

A panel of experts now recommends that a baby aspirin each day may be able to prevent up to a quarter of all cases of preeclampsia, a condition that develops in 4 percent of pregnancies and that can be life threatening for both the woman and the developing fetus.

A panel of experts now recommends that a baby aspirin each day may be able to prevent up to a quarter of all cases of preeclampsia, a condition that develops in 4 percent of pregnancies and that can be life threatening for both the woman and the developing fetus.

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Successful Home Visit Program for Mothers and Infants Lacks Long-Term Funding

(left to right) Chrystal Towne, RN; her former client, Sheren Sucilla, and Darcy Lowell, MD, testify on the effectiveness of the Maternal, Infant and EArly Childhood Home Visiting Program in the hearing room of the House Ways and Means Committee.

A hearing on the Maternal, Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program revealed impressive results for the low-income families it serves, and the money it saves taxpayers. But its funding runs out in six months.

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Wisconsin Asks Roberts Court to Review Admitting Privileges Law

If the petition is granted, the Supreme Court could dramatically limit how abortion restrictions are challenged.

If the petition is granted, the Supreme Court could dramatically limit how abortion restrictions are challenged.

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How Louisiana Slashed Medicaid Funding for Pregnant Women and Blamed a Typo

Louisiana health officials appear to have cut funding for the state’s Medicaid program for pregnant women based on a typo on the Affordable Care Act website, Healthcare.gov.

Louisiana health officials appear to have cut funding for the state’s Medicaid program for pregnant women based on a typo on the Affordable Care Act website, Healthcare.gov.

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Stress Kills: Economic Insecurity and Black Women’s Maternal Health Outcomes

When we hear “stress kills,” we often imagine a wealthy business executive dying of a heart attack in their early 50s because they put in too many long nights at the office. But stress also kills pregnant Black women and their babies in a more surreptitious way.

When we hear “stress kills,” we often imagine a wealthy business executive dying of a heart attack in their early 50s because they put in too many long nights at the office. But stress also kills pregnant Black women and their babies in a more surreptitious way.

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Double the Trouble, But Way More Than Twice the Price: Why Is Having Multiples So Expensive?

A new study shows that the cost of having twins is five times higher than the cost of having one baby; triplets or more can cost as much as $400,000. The researchers suggest this is yet another reason to reduce the number of embryos transferred during in vitro fertilization.

A new study shows that the cost of having twins is five times higher than the cost of having one baby; triplets or more can cost as much as $400,000. The researchers suggest this is yet another reason to reduce the number of embryos transferred during in vitro fertilization.

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