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Research Shows Philadelphia Failing UN Maternal and Infant Health Goals

Increasing support for family policy among lawmakers is encouraging—but what about the commitment of the private sector?

Philadelphia’s dire performance can be attributed to the collision of two major factors: widespread, profound poverty and a sharp reduction in the number of hospitals providing maternity care.

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Double the Trouble, But Way More Than Twice the Price: Why Is Having Multiples So Expensive?

A new study shows that the cost of having twins is five times higher than the cost of having one baby; triplets or more can cost as much as $400,000. The researchers suggest this is yet another reason to reduce the number of embryos transferred during in vitro fertilization.

A new study shows that the cost of having twins is five times higher than the cost of having one baby; triplets or more can cost as much as $400,000. The researchers suggest this is yet another reason to reduce the number of embryos transferred during in vitro fertilization.

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Wisconsin Lawmaker Seeks Change to ‘Fetal Protection’ Law

The 2-1 ruling requires crisis pregnancy centers disclose whether they have licensed medical providers at their facilities.

A Wisconsin lawmaker is pushing to change a law known as the “cocaine mom” act, in light of a high-profile case in which a pregnant woman was provided fewer legal protections than her fetus.

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Report Calls for Integrated Efforts to Reduce Teenage Pregnancy Worldwide

Teenage motherhood, especially for girls under 15 years old, has negative health and economic impacts for both the young girls and their communities.

Teenage motherhood, especially for girls under 15 years old, has negative health and economic impacts for both the young girls and their communities.

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New Definitions of Full-Term Pregnancy: Why They Matter

The new definitions hopefully will be a catalyst for the cultural shift toward allowing labor and delivery to begin on its own.

The new definitions endorsed by the American Congress of Obstetrics and Gynecologists hopefully will be a catalyst for a cultural shift toward allowing labor to begin on its own.

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Study: BPA Exposure May Increase Miscarriage Risk for Some Women

While a new study on BPA is far from definitive, it adds to a growing debate over how everyday chemicals affect reproductive health.

While a new study on BPA is far from definitive, it adds to a growing debate over how everyday chemicals affect reproductive health.

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Why Don’t More People Care About Black Maternal Deaths?

In September, 19-year-old Ayaanah Gibson (above) bled to death in her Benedict College dorm room after delivering a stillborn child.

What will it take to get people to recognize not just the racial disparity in death rates but the disparity in concern over U.S. Black women’s health and lives?

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What We Don’t Know Will Hurt Us: The Need for Chemical Policy Reform

Even those of us with access to the best prenatal care and the resources to make (sometimes expensive) changes to our lifestyles can’t completely eliminate exposure to chemicals that are harming our health and that of our families.

The Chemical Safety Improvement Act is bipartisan legislation that offers an opportunity for chemical policy reform to help ensure all pregnant women see a decrease in exposure to chemicals.

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CMV: The Little-Known Virus That May Endanger Your Pregnancy

Micrograph of cytomegalovirus (CMV) placentitis.

Although most of the general public, as well as some in the medical profession, are unaware of the dangers of a CMV infection to the fetus of a pregnant woman, CMV causes more birth defects and congenital disabilities in children than all other well-known diseases.

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Behind the HIV ‘Miracle Cure,’ a Broken System Lurks

2013-03-06-belden

There’s been much talk this week about the “miracle cure” of a child with HIV. But what about the unjust health-care system that failed her mother?

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