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Marital Status Doesn’t Cause Poverty—Not Having Money Does

Poverty is caused by not having enough money. This should be obvious, but clearly it needs to be said more often.

Conservatives have been turning up the volume on the irrational, unevidenced claim that poverty is caused by not being married. In reality, poverty is caused by not having enough money. This should be obvious, but it clearly needs to be said more often.

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Pennsylvania’s New Medicaid Plan Likely to Reduce Access to Birth Control for Low-Income Women

I should not have to choose between keeping my job and losing my dignity.

The plan will result in less access to affordable, consistent birth control for the poor working women of Pennsylvania—which, as the federal birth control mandate demonstrates, is counter to the intention of health-care reform.

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Abortion Restrictions Are Expensive

New anti-choice laws in Texas and other states around the country could push more women and their families deeper into poverty.

New anti-choice laws in Texas and other states around the country could push more women and their families deeper into poverty.

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Why Abortion Funds Are Needed, Even in Pro-Choice States

Abortion funds are critical because they help bridge the gap left by the Hyde Amendment and enable access to abortion for those who are financially denied their right to choose.

Abortion funds are critical because they help bridge the gap left by the Hyde Amendment and enable access to abortion for those who are financially denied their right to choose.

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Learning the Right Lessons From the Philadelphia Abortion Clinic Disaster

Gosnell’s clinic is an extreme version of what I call “rogue clinics,” facilities that today prey on women, primarily women of color and often immigrants, in low-income communities.

Gosnell’s clinic is an extreme version of what I call “rogue clinics,” facilities that today prey on women, primarily women of color and often immigrants, in low-income communities.

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Roe at Forty: Today in Texas, it is Yesterday

Texans rally at the state capitol to celebrate the 40th anniversary of Roe v. Wade. (NARAL Pro-Choice Texas)

What does a future without Roe v. Wade look like? In a lot of ways, it looks like Texas, where those who are in the least ideal financial and socio-economic position to provide for an unplanned-for child are the ones for whom abortion–and contraception–is hardest to access.

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With Helms and Hyde, No Roe Anniversary for Low-Income Women

After 40 years, isn’t it time that our policies reflect real women and real families?

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Taking Action: Making Roe Real for All Women

Norma McCorvey (or "Jane Roe" in Roe v. Wade) and lawyer Gloria Allred (right), in 1989. (J. Scott Applewhite/AP)

 On this 40th anniversary of Roe v. Wade, we honor and celebrate US women’s legal right to abortion, and we reaffirm our commitment to ensuring that abortion is accessible to women everywhere, and that the promise of the decision is a reality for all of us.

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How the Hyde Amendment Harms Women

For nearly four decades, the Hyde Amendment has limited the abilities of low-income women to implement timely decisions about ending a pregnancy.

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In Texas, the Numbers Reveal Just How Dire Things Will Be for Medicaid Patients Without Planned Parenthood

Photo: Eddie Seal/The Texas Tribune.

If Texas excludes Planned Parenthood from participating in its new state-funded “Texas Women’s Health Program,” 1,748 clients in one city alone–Austin–will have to find new health care providers. That means existing providers, some of which currently see just one or two patients a year, will have to take on about 60 new patients each, even as they deal with a 66 percent cut in overall family planning funding.

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