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A Response to an Open Letter on Reproductive Justice and ‘Choice’

Dear Monica Simpson and colleagues, I want to be as clear as possible: Planned Parenthood values your work deeply. We honor your past and present efforts to broaden our collective efforts to address the multiple injustices that women face. We appreciate that you push us to do this more, and to do it better. And we hear you when you say that we are not doing enough.

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Reproductive Justice and ‘Choice': An Open Letter to Planned Parenthood

The recent exclusion of the long-term work of scores of reproductive justice organizations, activists, and researchers that have challenged the “pro-choice” label for 20 years, seen recently in New York Times and Huffington Post articles, is not only disheartening but, intentionally or not, continues the co-optation and erasure of the tremendously hard work done by Indigenous women and women of color for decades.

The recent exclusion of the long-term work of scores of reproductive justice organizations, activists, and researchers that have challenged the “pro-choice” label for 20 years, seen recently in New York Times and Huffington Post articles, is not only disheartening but, intentionally or not, continues the co-optation and erasure of the tremendously hard work done by Indigenous women and women of color for decades.

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Sex-Selective Abortion Bans Highlight Faultlines in the Reproductive Rights Movement

Sex-selection bans have indeed proliferated throughout the US. They have also merited relative silence from the mainstream reproductive rights movement.

South Dakota could soon become the eighth state in the country to pass a sex-selective abortion ban. Yet these bills have yet to merit a larger conversation, either within the national reproductive rights and feminist movements or in the news more generally.

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Black Women Are an Electoral Voting Force. Recognize.

As a matter of movement-building, the repeated refusal to recognize Black women for the electoral force that we are leaves us feeling disconnected. National organizations rely on us to deliver reproductive rights victories, but rarely give us credit for doing so.

As a matter of movement-building, the repeated refusal to recognize Black women for the electoral force that we are leaves us feeling disconnected. National organizations rely on us to deliver reproductive rights victories, but rarely give us credit for doing so.

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For Latinas, The IOM Recommendations on Women’s Health Represent a Big Win

Virtually every one of the IOM recommendations will greatly benefit Latina women. whether they are seeking to plan and space pregnancies, have healthy pregnancies, keep their infants healthy, or get basic preventive healthcare.

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Live from Iowa: Latina Empowerment

A radio drama written and directed by an MFA student at the University of Iowa aims to empower Latina women about sexual health. The program, called “La Noche Te De Sorpresas,” or “The Night Gives You Surprises,” is broadcast in Spanish and is one of two culturally-specific radio shows being launched by the University of Iowa College of Public Health and the Iowa Initiative to Reduce Unintended Pregnancies.

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