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Reflections On My One-Year Anniversary: Latinas Hold the Power and Potential of This Nation’s Future

In the whirlwind of policy debates and activist conferences, it is easy to gloss over the victories we’ve accomplished together this past year. As I look forward to my next year, I’m glad to have such powerful hermanas beside me because we still have much work to tackle. 

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The Call: A Choice No Mother Should Face

As the rights of women are increasingly under attack in the continuing “war on women,” an entire population deeply affected by this conversation continues to be largely ignored: immigrant women.

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Start Shooting, Take Away Votes, This Is Campaigning In Arizona

Samuel "Joe the Plumber" Wurzelbacher. AP.

If you want to see the most extreme Republican political views, you just have to look south.

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Soy Poderosa Because I Resist: Undocumented and Unafraid

I believed the promises my teachers told me, about working hard to achieve your dreams. I didn’t know that all this hard work would go unnoticed if I wasn’t a citizen.

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Soy Poderosa Because I Can Lend My Voice in Solidarity

My cousin, who was once so hopeful about her life and her future, now felt trapped and betrayed by the American Dream and, even worse, she felt alone. I don’t know what exactly happened to me after that day, but something struck inside of me and I knew I had to do something for my cousin and for the thousands of people like her.

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Poderosa Profile: Margie Del Castillo

In order to be successful in our fight for reproductive justice, we Latinas must recognize our poder. NLIRH’s “Soy Poderosa” campaign is trying to do just that.

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Who is a “Criminal?” Exclusion of Vulnerable Groups from International AIDS Conference Nothing to Celebrate

Protesters disrupt the panel of US Senators at the Conference. Think Progress.

The definition of criminal offenses, the selective implementation of the law, and the resulting stereotypes generate a self-enforcing loop of discrimination and exclusion to the detriment of all. The exclusion of so many legitimate voices from this year’s AIDS conference is just one example.

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A Call to Change U.S. Policy on Sex Work and HIV

Kaytee Riek.

The U.S. law that prohibits sex workers and drug users from attending the IAC from abroad is a frightening sign of the times. As co-directors of two U.S-based sex workers rights organizations, we stand with sex workers in their global fight for rights.

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My Letter to Delegates at AIDS 2012

In July, Washington, D.C. will host a conference on HIV/AIDS, where participants will gather to discuss to the latest science and policy of HIV treatment and prevention. Yet the country’s immigration policy denies entry to those disproportionately affected by the pandemic—people dependent on drugs—because of their medical condition.

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AIDS 2012: Criminalized Groups Need Not Apply

Drug users and sex workers represent the majority of people living with HIV in many countries, and are among the most at-risk of infection everywhere. The irony of allowing people living with HIV to the conference while refusing those likeliest to be—or become—infected has not been lost on everyone.

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