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This Week in Sex: Chicago Pushes HPV Vaccine, a Study on Sex and Class, and Sex Ed for Seniors

Chicago launches a new initiative to up the number of teens who get vaccinated for HPV.

This week, Chicago launches a new initiative to up the number of teens who get vaccinated for HPV, a Spanish study makes headlines about how rich people supposedly have better sex, and a New York Times op-ed urges safe sex for seniors.

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One Dose of HPV Vaccine May Be Enough, Study Finds

Chicago launches a new initiative to up the number of teens who get vaccinated for HPV.

A new study of women in Costa Rica finds that one dose of the HPV vaccine may be enough to create the antibodies needed to prevent infection. If confirmed, this could be good news for people in the United States and abroad.

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Study: Low-Income Girls Less Likely to Get HPV Vaccine, Reasons Vary

Chicago launches a new initiative to up the number of teens who get vaccinated for HPV.

New research found that low-income parents do not get their daughters vaccinated with the HPV vaccine for a variety of reasons, including inadequate explanations by health-care providers, distrust of the government and medicine, and beliefs about pre-marital sex.

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New York Bill Would Allow Teens to Get HPV Vaccine Without Parental Consent

The bad news is that neck and throat cancers are rising, and this common sexually transmitted infection seems to be the cause. The good news: The vaccines that are available to prevent infection seem to protect against these kind of cancers as well.

A new bill in the New York State Assembly would allow minors to consent to receiving the HPV vaccine without parental consent. Unsurprisingly, it has been met with some opposition.

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Why it May Be Good That Michael Douglas Said Cunnilingus Caused His Cancer (UPDATED)

Academy Award wining actor Michael Douglas told the Guardian that sex caused his cancer. Though his announcement may over-emphasize the dangers of oral sex, it will hopefully get more people talking about the HPV vaccine.

Though Douglas’ announcement may have over-emphasized the dangers of oral sex, it will hopefully get more people talking about HPV and the HPV vaccine.

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The Hidden Reality of Cancer in Latin America and the Caribbean

In Latin America and the Caribbean, cancer is a rapidly growing and increasingly deadly epidemic.

In poor countries, cervical cancer is often the most common cancer-related death among women, or even the leading cause of death for women, period.

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Sexual Health Roundup: Illinois to Improve Sex Ed, Changing HPV Messages, and West Virginia Bans Teen Sexting

This week, West Virginia bans sexting among teenagers.

This week, the Illinois senate took up a bill requiring that sex education be medically accurate, West Virginia took on teen sexting, and a new study suggested we may need to change our HPV messages if we want more women to get the vaccine.

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Despite Dangers of Cervical Cancer, Many Parents Still Don’t Vaccinate Their Kids Against HPV

Doctor giving vaccination into arm

When it comes to HPV, somehow many parents still have it backwards—in reality, the HPV vaccine is safe, but cervical cancer is both dangerous and all too common.

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If You Give It, They’ll Be Tramps: An Offensive, False, But Oft-Repeated Argument About Reproductive Health Technologies

horizontal couple with man grabbing buttocks

The argument that access to sexual health care or information causes promiscuity is offensive to women and has been proven false time and again. Yet it seems unlikely that it we will end anytime soon.

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It’s Official: The HPV Vaccine Will Not Turn Girls Into “Sluts”

It’s not surprising that a vaccine has no effect on adolescent sexual behavior. What is surprising is that fear of “sluttiness” is the number-one reason parents decide not to vaccinate their kids against HPV.

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