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Why the Affordable Care Act is Critical For Women Living With HIV

As we hold our breath to see how the Court will decide the fate of the ACA, now is a good time to remind ourselves of the importance of health care reform for women living with HIV and affected by HIV.

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PEPFAR, Youth, and the AIDS Epidemic: A Call for Real Leadership on Prevention

We must seize this opportunity to promote a truly science-based, holistic, HIV prevention strategy for young people in the U.S. and abroad. In the end, it is young people who hold the key to ending this epidemic. That’s why they should be at the center, not the periphery, of our programs and policies.

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What Innovations Are Helping HIV+ Women in the Dominican Republic?

PROFAMILIA in the Dominican Republic successfully links HIV testing and treatment and SRH services and becomes a model for the region.

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Sexual Health Roundup: Rates of HIV Infection in African-American Women Five Times Higher Than Previously Thought

Weekly Sexual Health Round Up: Rate of new HIV infection among African-American women in some communities matches that of countries in sub-Saharan Africa; men more likely to die during extra-marital sex; porn industry reacts to condom mandates.

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Why Does the President’s Budget Cut Critical Services for Women with HIV and AIDS?

President Obama’s proposed budget, released last month, was reasonably true to his Administration’s commitment to working toward an AIDS-free generation. But a major disappointment is the proposed cut to the Ryan White Part D budget, the only Part of the program that serves the unique needs of  women, children, youth and families–and the only part of the Program to take a hit.

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A Call to Action: Integrate Family Planning and HIV Services to Save Women’s Lives

All photos courtesy of Marie Stopes International.

In 2012, three years before the 2015 deadline the world set for itself to reduce preventable maternal deaths and new HIV infections, we must act more boldly than we have up until now. The global health community must work to bring family planning and HIV services together – and quickly – to save women’s lives.

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Revisiting Marianismo

Revisiting a “cultural value” among Latin@s and an interview with documentarian Erica Fletcher who created a film Marianismo about Latinas living with HIV.

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From Tuskegee to Transparency: An Evolution in the Ethics and Accountability of Clinical Trials Involving Human Subjects

People who participate in clinical trials take the enormous step of volunteering to test a product that may be useful and, sometimes, life-saving if it turns out to be effective. They play an irreplaceable role in research to prevent, treat, and sometimes cure illness – as well as to find other ways to improve people’s health and lives.

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New Study Suggests HIV Risk with Hormonal Contraceptives: What It Means for Family Planning Policy and Programs

new study published this week in The Lancet Infectious Diseases suggests that use of hormonal contraceptives, particularly injectables, may double the risk of uninfected women acquiring HIV. 

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Hormonal Contraception and HIV: Weighing the Evidence and Balancing the Risks

An article in yesterday’s New York Times suggesting that injectable contraceptive use might double the risk of HIV transmission among women in Africa sent waves of anxiety through the global public health community, leading some to ask whether we should halt delivery of injectables. But experts say: “Not so fast.”

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