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Bullets Dodged: The Anti-Choice Bills That Didn’t Pass This Year

For every awful anti-choice bill that passes into law, there are about a dozen others that fail, or indeed never see the light of day. Here's a list of some major bullets dodged so far this year in the state legislatures.

For every odious anti-choice bill that passes into law, there are about a dozen others that fail, or never see the light of day. Here’s a list of some major bullets dodged so far this year in the state legislatures.

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Legal Wrap: States Turn to Prosecuting Pregnant People

Tennessee lawmakers proposed a dangerous new law that allows for prosecuting pregnant people while a South Carolina woman will serve time after prosecutors claim she killed her infant via breastfeeding.

Tennessee lawmakers proposed a dangerous new law that allows for prosecuting pregnant people, as a South Carolina woman was sentenced to 20 years in prison for allegedly killing her infant while breastfeeding.

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State Policy Trends: More Supportive Legislation, Even as Attacks on Abortion Rights Continue

While witnesses on both sides of the issue claimed to be in favor of protecting women’s health, anti-choice witnesses relied heavily on debunked science and distorted interpretations of the bill to make many of their claims.

Some 64 provisions have been introduced so far this year to expand or protect access to abortion, more than had been introduced in any year in the last quarter-century.

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Americans United for Life’s Efforts to Eliminate Insurance Coverage for Abortion Get Help From ALEC Members

The confluence of ALEC and AUL is further evidence of a new trend on the political right.

Twenty-three states have passed laws barring abortion coverage from insurance plans within state health exchanges. What has largely gone unnoticed is that many of these policies emanate from Americans United for Life, a little-known group that regularly has access to conservative lawmakers at the annual ALEC conferences.

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The Work Behind ‘Roe v. Wade’ Continues

We must do more than ensure the right to reproductive health care is legal. We must ensure it’s available and accessible in every way.

We must do more than ensure the right to reproductive health care is legal. We must ensure it’s available and accessible in every way.

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More Abortion Restrictions Were Enacted From 2011 to 2013 Than in the Entire Previous Decade

Twenty-two states enacted 70 abortion restrictions during 2013. This makes 2013 second only to 2011 in the number of new abortion restrictions enacted in a single year.

In 2013, 39 states enacted 141 provisions related to reproductive health and rights. Half of these new provisions, 70 in 22 states, sought to restrict access to abortion services.

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Study Reveals Dramatic Rise in Share of Women Accessing Contraception Without a Co-Pay

Lawsuits by Hobby Lobby and Conestoga Wood challenge the contraceptive coverage requirement under the Affordable Care Act, which says that certain preventive health-care services like contraception must be covered without copay or cost sharing.

A new study finds that the Affordable Care Act is responsible for a dramatic rise in the share of privately insured women in the United States who have gained access to contraception without a co-pay.

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This Week in Sex: Magical Thinking About Pregnancy, Home Herpes Testing, and Mr. Balls

Senhor Testiculo, or Mr. Balls

This week, a new study finds many young women who experienced an unintended pregnancy thought it couldn’t happen to them, a home STD test might provide false reassurance, and Mr. Balls reminds us about testicular cancer.

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State Policy Trends 2013: Abortion Bans Move to the Forefront

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Unlike in recent years, when the thrust of legislative activity was on regulating abortion, this year legislators seem to be focusing on banning abortion outright.

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Teen Birth Rates Hit Historic Lows; More Access to Contraceptives Credited

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Teen birth rates fell to an historic low in 2011 thanks, in part, to new policies that make it easier for teens to access contraception. 

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