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Salvadoran Supreme Court Denies Beatriz Her Right to Life

"We are all Beatriz and we repudiate the Supreme Court."

In a stunning decision made worse by the length of time it took to be handed down, the Supreme Court of El Salvador denied a young woman “permission” on Wednesday for an abortion needed to save her life.

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Why Is El Salvador Letting a Woman Die?

A new lawsuit claims Catholic-owned hospitals are negligent in treating pregnant people while the Roberts Court takes up two challenges to the contraception mandate.

The only reasonable explanation for the public stand-off is that Beatriz and other resource-poor women are politically expendable, and that crossing the Catholic Church is seen as worse than being hung out in the press as inhumane.

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In El Salvador, a Country Awaits the Supreme Court Decision on Beatriz’s Life

savebeatrizspanish

As people take to the streets in support of Beatriz, pressure is mounting on the Supreme Court of El Salvador to finally make a decision granting Beatriz a life-saving abortion. Meanwhile, Beatriz’s mother pleads for her daughter’s life.

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Respecting Beatriz’s Freedom of Conscience

Let us remember what Jesus Christ said in the Gospels: the law was made for human beings; human beings are not made for the law. The law which penalizes abortion is cruel and inhuman, as it condemns many women to death.

At a time when religious extremists around the globe have repackaged their efforts to undermine reproductive rights within a call for greater protection for religious liberty, will the Salvadoran Supreme Court of Justice respect Beatriz’s freedom of conscience?

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BREAKING: 45,000 Worldwide Call on El Salvador to Save Beatriz

More than 45,000 people in the United States and internationally are demanding that Mauricio Funes, President of El Salvador, immediately authorize doctors to perform an abortion to save the life of Beatriz, a 22-year old woman and mother of a toddler.

More than 45,000 people in the United States and internationally are demanding that Mauricio Funes, President of El Salvador, immediately authorize doctors to perform an abortion to save the life of Beatriz, a 22-year old woman and mother of a toddler.

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Human Rights Bodies Call on El Salvador to Provide Life-Saving Abortion

International human rights bodies are urging the government of El Salvador to act to save Beatriz. Please add your voice.

International human rights bodies are urging the government of El Salvador to act to save Beatriz. Please add your voice.

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Women’s Rights Groups Demand Immediate Action for El Salvadoran Woman in Need of Life-Saving Abortion

A market street in Caluco, El Salvador.

Women’s rights groups are demanding that doctors in El Salvador immediately perform an abortion to save the life of Beatriz, a 22-year old woman and mother of an infant.

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In El Salvador, Yet Another Woman’s Life Subordinated to Non-Viable Fetus

The story of “Beatriz,” the 22-year-old woman caught in the firestorm of the abortion conflict in El Salvador, continues.

A 22-year-old Salvadoran woman with severe chronic medical conditions is pregnant with a fetus without a brain. But a 1998 law in El Salvador prohibits all abortions, without exception.

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How Many Amalias, Karinas, and Savitas Must There Be? Las Savitas de Centroamérica

Here in Central America, women are denied life-saving treatment every day. Women with life-threatening illnesses are denied treatment because to do so might harm their pregnancy—just the same explanation that Savita’s husband received from their doctors in Galway.  [This article is published in both English and Spanish.]

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Tragedy in El Salvador: Church-Supported Laws Lead to Death of Mother Jailed After Miscarriage

El Salvador today is not a good place to be a woman. In 1998, the government passed a new Penal Code creating a complete ban on abortion. No exceptions. And now with the pregnancy police combing hospitals, even women with miscarriages are going to jail.

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