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Government Recommendations on Zika Virus Not Grounded in Reality, Say El Salvador Locals

The country’s Ministry of Health recommended last week that women should avoid becoming pregnant until 2018. But local feminist groups say this guidance doesn’t reflect the needs of Salvadoran women, especially where reproductive health is concerned.

The country’s Ministry of Health recommended last week that women should avoid becoming pregnant until 2018. But local feminist groups say this guidance doesn’t reflect the needs of Salvadoran women, especially where reproductive health is concerned.

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Advocates: Dems Struggling to Address Detainment and Detention of Immigrants

We as a country need to stop seeing detention and deportation as solutions  for the immigration issues we have.

We as a country need to stop seeing detention and deportation as solutions for the immigration issues we have.

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Hunger Strike at Texas Detention Center Swells Into the Hundreds (Updated)

Cristina Parker, immigration programs director for Grassroots Leadership, speaking at a rally to end family detention on May 2 in Dilley, Texas

The strike at a Texas immigrant detention facility has swelled to almost 500 since last Wednesday, according to Grassroots Leadership, an organization that forms part of a larger umbrella group known as Texans United for Families.

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‘Why Such Violent Treatment of These Women in El Salvador?’ Asks Commission on Human Rights

Earlier this month, Christina Quintanilla, who spent four years in prison after experiencing a miscarriage, testified in front of the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights about the effects of the El Salvador's total abortion ban on the country's women.

Earlier this month, Christina Quintanilla, who spent four years in prison after experiencing a miscarriage, testified in front of the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights about the effects of the El Salvador’s total abortion ban on the country’s women.

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Heavily Edited Attack Videos Jeopardizing Fight for Women’s Rights Abroad

In El Salvador, where abortion is illegal even in cases of rape, incest, and maternal danger, on-the-ground feminist organizations have been targeted by mainstream news media outlets publishing articles based on the Center for Medical Progress’ deceptive undercover videos.

In El Salvador, where abortion is illegal even in cases of rape, incest, and maternal danger, on-the-ground feminist organizations have been targeted by mainstream news media outlets publishing articles based on the Center for Medical Progress’ deceptive undercover videos.

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Woman in El Salvador Acquitted of Homicide Charges for Pregnancy Complications

Carmelina Pérez, a Honduran woman living in El Salvador, was sentenced to 30 years in prison in July 2014 after suffering what appeared to be a miscarriage. But last week, she was acquitted of all charges, setting a possible new precedent in the fight for reproductive justice in El Salvador.

Carmelina Pérez, a Honduran woman living in El Salvador, was sentenced to 30 years in prison in July 2014 after suffering what appeared to be a miscarriage. But last week, she was acquitted of all charges, setting a possible new precedent in the fight for reproductive justice in El Salvador.

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Inside El Salvador’s Women’s Prison: What ‘Las 17’ Face for Their Abortion-Related Charges

Last week, RH Reality Check met with six of the 17 Salvadoran women imprisoned for what amount to pregnancy complications. The women discussed the challenges they face, including harassment from other inmates and overcrowded conditions.

Last week, RH Reality Check met with six of the 17 Salvadoran women imprisoned for what amount to pregnancy complications. The women discussed the challenges they face, including harassment from other inmates and overcrowded conditions.

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What’s Next for the Rest of the Salvadoran Women Imprisoned on Abortion-Related Charges?

Fifteen of the women known as “Las 17” are still in prison—and activists hope increased international attention will spur the Salvadoran government into taking just action.

Last week, the Legislative Assembly of El Salvador voted to grant a pardon to Guadalupe, who was charged with aggravated homicide after an obstetrical complication she suffered in 2007. But 15 of the women known as “Las 17” are still in prison—and activists hope increased international attention will spur the Salvadoran government into taking just action.

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El Salvador Legislature Denies Pardon to One of ‘Las 17’—But Hope Isn’t Lost (Updated)

The El Salvador national legislature had the opportunity on January 16 to pardon a woman named Guadalupe, who was convicted of aggravated homicide against her newborn when, in fact, she had suffered obstetrical complications. Her petition fell one vote short of approval, but the story isn't over.

The El Salvador national legislature had the opportunity on January 16 to pardon a woman named Guadalupe, who was convicted of aggravated homicide against her newborn when, in fact, she had suffered obstetrical complications. Her petition fell one vote short of approval, but the story isn’t over.

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Salvadoran Council Uses Poverty to Justify Keeping ‘Las 17’ in Prison

When determining whether to pardon the Salvadoran women incarcerated on abortion-related charges, the country's National Criminology Council gave "unfavorable" recommendations for 12 of them based on factors such as "scarce economic resources."

When determining whether to pardon the Salvadoran women incarcerated on abortion-related charges, the country’s National Criminology Council gave “unfavorable” recommendations for 12 of them based on factors such as “scarce economic resources.”

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