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Pregnant Texas Woman Denied Methadone Treatment in Jail Released to Home Monitoring

Jessica De Samito, who is six months pregnant and needs methadone maintenance therapy to maintain her pregnancy, will continue treatment at home.

Jessica De Samito, who is six months pregnant and needs methadone maintenance therapy to maintain her pregnancy, will continue treatment at home.

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First Woman Arrested Under Tennessee Pregnancy Criminalization Law, for a Drug Not Covered Under the Law

Mallory Loyola was arrested Tuesday under a new Tennessee law that criminalizes mothers whose babies are exposed to certain illegal drugs in utero.

The law specifically criminalizes “the illegal use of a narcotic drug while pregnant, if [a woman's] child is born addicted to or harmed by the narcotic drug.” But Mallory Loyola was arrested Tuesday for exposing her child to amphetamine, which is not a narcotic.

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Texas Jailers Deny Pregnant Navy Vet Medication Needed to Continue Her Pregnancy

A graphic created by National Advocates for Pregnant Women to promote justice for Jessica De Samito, who says a Texas county jail is withholding the methadone treatment she needs to sustain her pregnancy.

Advocates for 30-year-old Jessica De Samito, who is 24 weeks pregnant, say a Texas county jail is withholding the methadone treatment she needs to sustain her pregnancy.

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Advocates Urge Eighth Circuit to Revisit Viability Standard in ‘Roe’

Arkansas is the latest state to see a direct attack on Roe v. Wade as fetal "personhood" advocates ramp up attacks on reproductive autonomy.

Arkansas is the latest state to see a direct attack on Roe v. Wade as fetal “personhood” advocates ramp up attacks on reproductive autonomy.

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The 50th Anniversary of Mississippi’s Freedom Summer: Remembering What Fannie Lou Hamer Taught Us

Fannie Lou Hamer  used the power of storytelling to compel America to recognize the humanity of poor Black people in Mississippi.

Modern Mississippi freedom fighters must remain committed to Hamer’s legacy of bridging voting and reproductive rights into a comprehensive reproductive justice effort to protect Black women and other populations that are vulnerable to violations of both.

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The Struggle and Strength of Mothers With Addictions

The author, Roxanne Ambrose.

The stigma put on addiction and addicts has been very painful for me. For much of my life, I have felt like society judged women like me, throwing us away as if our lives didn’t hold any value. Despite our struggles, we eat, breathe, and bleed like everybody else. We are human.

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Legal Wrap: Conservative Judges Setting the Boundaries in Fight for Abortion Rights

From the Alabama Supreme Court to the U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit, conservative anti-abortion judges are setting the legal boundaries in the fight for abortion access.

From the Alabama Supreme Court to the U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit, conservative anti-choice judges are setting the legal boundaries in the fight for abortion access.

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Alabama Supreme Court Justices Make Case for Prosecuting Abortions

The justices of the Alabama Supreme Court

In a decision interpreting the state’s chemical endangerment statute, two justices of the Alabama Supreme Court argued for jailing women who terminate pregnancies.

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Tennessee Governor Signs Bill Criminalizing Pregnant Women

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam (above) signed a bill Tuesday that will allow criminal charges against women who struggle with drug dependency during their pregnancy.

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam signed a bill Tuesday that will allow criminal charges against women who struggle with drug dependency during their pregnancy.

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Choice, Surrogacy, and a Troubling Response to My Previous Commentary on Criminalization

If enacted, SB 302 would make surrogate parents, gestational carriers, and anyone who "is involved in, or induces, arranges or otherwise assists in the formation of a surrogate parenting contract" liable to up to a $10,000 fine or imprisonment of up to one year.

Last week, RH Reality Check published a piece in response to an earlier commentary I wrote about what was being billed as a feminist effort to criminalize surrogacy in Kansas. Much as I respect them, it appears the co-authors of that article responded to a straw man.

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