· · · · · 

Conscience Clauses, Not Just An American Problem

Mary Doogan. [img src]

Two midwives in Glasgow claim being asked even to delegate duties to other practitioners constitutes “assisting” in an abortion.

· · · · · 

Kansas in 2012? A Prediction of More Legal Battles, Higher Tax Bills, and Declining Access to Services

Until a change of course is demanded in the state of Kansas, our elected oppressors will no doubt continue to spend their time, energy, resources and taxpayer money in the never-ending pursuit of being the first state to eliminate abortion and even some forms of contraception through the eradication of access, while saddling the taxpayers with an ideological debt.

· · · · · 

New Jersey University Hires More Staff To Cover Nurses Who Won’t Come Near Abortion Patients

[original img src]

As a result of the twelve nurses who refuse to provide any sort of service to patients obtaining abortions, the medical center will need to hire additional staff.

· · · · · 

Contraception: Expand Access, Not Exemptions

A broad religious exemption for contraceptive coverage would go too far, depriving millions of women of an important health benefit. Instead of expanding exemptions, we should be expanding access to affordable care.

· · · · · 

Is Prepping a Patient “Assisting In An Abortion?”

The fight over whether or not nurses were forced to participate in abortions against their will may mostly be a matter of semantics.

· · · · · 

Do New Health Law Mandates Threaten Conscience Rights and Access to Care?

I firmly believe the requirements under the Affordable Care Act, and the slate of regulations being created to implement it, infringe on no one’s conscience, demand no one change her or his religious beliefs, discriminate against no man or woman, put no additional economic burden on the poor, interfere with no one’s medical decisions, compromise no one’s health — that is, if you consider the law without refusal clauses.

· · · · · 

Religious Exemptions and Contraceptive Coverage: How Far Can Denial Go and Still Be Constitutional?

The Department of Health and Human Services has included contraceptive coverage as essential preventive care under the Affordable Care Act, while exempting organizations with an explicit religious mission from having to comply. For some, this exemption does not go far enough. But how far can religious right organizations go in denying their employees access to essential preventive care?

· · · · · 

HHS Adopts IOM Recommendations on Reproductive Health Care; Exempts “Religious Employers” From Birth Control Coverage

The Department of Health and Human Services has adopted guidelines for insurance coverage on women’s preventive health services that include all the recommendations recently made by the Institute of Medicine and require new health insurance plans to cover women’s preventive services such as well-woman visits, breastfeeding support, domestic violence screening, and contraception without charging a co-payment, co-insurance or a deductible.

· · · · · 

What Pharmacy Denials in Missouri Would Mean for Me

As more states debate legislation to protect pharmacists who refuse to fill prescriptions on “moral” grounds, many consumers may face debates, forced public disclosures or delay at the pharmacy counter.

· · · · · 

Catholics, Evangelicals Pledge to Ignore Gay Rights and Abortion Laws

Human rights advocates stated that a pledge signed last Friday by religious leaders that they won’t abide by laws supporting gay marriage or abortion “perpetuates the fallacy that equality and religious liberty are incompatible and that civil rights are another burden on religious people.”

· · · · ·