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RHTP Agrees Condoms Do Not Cause Cancer and Has Never Stated Otherwise

On Friday, Melissa White, the CEO of an online condom retailer, attacked the findings of a study that found a small number of the condoms she sells on her website contain a chemical carcinogen called nitrosamines. In doing so, she misrepresents both our report and its conclusions.

On Friday, Melissa White, the CEO of an online condom retailer, attacked the findings of a study that found a small number of the condoms she sells on her website contain a chemical carcinogen called nitrosamines. In doing so, she misrepresents both our report and its conclusions.

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Cigarettes Cause Cancer; Condoms Don’t

A new petition calls on the FDA to “Get Carcinogens Out of Condoms.” But there is no scientific evidence linking condoms to cancer—and to claim otherwise has the potential to unravel decades of committed work focused on saving lives through encouraging condom use and education.

A new petition calls on the FDA to “Get Carcinogens Out of Condoms.” But there is no scientific evidence linking condoms to cancer—and to claim otherwise has the potential to unravel decades of committed work focused on saving lives through encouraging condom use and education.

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Condoms Are Way More Effective Than the New York Times Says They Are

Last week, New York Times columnist, Nicholas Kristof wrote a great op-ed entitled, “Politics, Teens and Birth Control,” in which he eloquently described teen pregnancy as a problem of irresponsible adults not hormone-addled teens. Unfortunately, the article includes a misleading statistic that suggests people who rely on condoms for pregnancy prevention will eventually, inevitably become pregnant.

Unfortunately, Nicholas Kristof’s great op-ed on teenage pregnancy in the New York Times last week included a misleading statistic that suggests people who rely on condoms for pregnancy prevention will eventually, inevitably become pregnant.

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The Much Maligned Condom: Why We Can’t Be Surprised Use Is Down Among Teens

Once hailed as a lifesaver and necessity for everyone thinking about having sex, condoms are now frequently maligned.

Once hailed as a lifesaver and necessity for everyone thinking about having sex, condoms are now frequently maligned—young people are surrounded by messages suggesting they don’t work, they break, and they take all the fun out of sex.

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Teen Survey Shows No Progress in Safer Sex Behavior

The results of the 2013 Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System, which were released on Friday, are somewhat discouraging. On almost every measure of safer sexual behavior, progress has either stagnated or, in cases like condom use, reversed.

The results of the 2013 Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System, which were released on Friday, are somewhat discouraging. On almost every measure of safer sexual behavior, progress has either stagnated or, in cases like condom use, reversed.

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Why the CDC Stopped Calling Sex Without a Condom ‘Unprotected Sex’

red condoms

For many years, the term “unprotected sex” has been synonymous with “sex without a condom.” But some HIV advocates argue that this language is outdated and imprecise, and the CDC has agreed to change it.

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Study Examines Spring Breakers, Sex, and Alcohol

A new study looks at college students’ behavior with regards to sex and drinking while on spring break and how that behavior is related to what they think everyone else is doing.

A new study looks at college students’ behavior with regards to sex and drinking while on spring break and how that behavior is related to what they think everyone else is doing.

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Pediatricians Group Advocates for Greater Condom Access for Teens

condoms

The American Academy of Pediatrics released a statement Monday arguing that all barriers to condom access for teens should be removed because increased availability increases use—but does not increase sexual activity.

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Memo to Trojan: Non-Married People Have Sex. Get Over It

Trojan has sexy new ads for its condoms, but they only show married couples. Why are we still afraid of talking about non-married sex, even though sex between non-married people is a near-universal behavior in America?

Trojan has sexy new ads for its condoms, but they only show married couples. Why are we still afraid of talking about non-married sex, even though sex between non-married people is a near-universal behavior in America?

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Friends-With-Benefits Use Condoms but It Might Not be Enough, Porn Stars Aren’t Damaged Goods, and Harvard Gets a Sex Club

In this week’s sexual health round-up: research found that friends-with-benefits are more likely to use condoms than those in romantic relationships but since they’re also more likely to have multiple partners this might not have a positive impact on their sexual health; other research tested the theory that porn stars are “damaged goods” and the results may be surprising, and when you think Ivy League think kinky sex as Harvard gets a new club. 

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