· · · · · 

A Response to an Open Letter on Reproductive Justice and ‘Choice’

Dear Monica Simpson and colleagues, I want to be as clear as possible: Planned Parenthood values your work deeply. We honor your past and present efforts to broaden our collective efforts to address the multiple injustices that women face. We appreciate that you push us to do this more, and to do it better. And we hear you when you say that we are not doing enough.

· · · · · 

Reproductive Justice and ‘Choice’: An Open Letter to Planned Parenthood

The recent exclusion of the long-term work of scores of reproductive justice organizations, activists, and researchers that have challenged the “pro-choice” label for 20 years, seen recently in New York Times and Huffington Post articles, is not only disheartening but, intentionally or not, continues the co-optation and erasure of the tremendously hard work done by Indigenous women and women of color for decades.

The recent exclusion of the long-term work of scores of reproductive justice organizations, activists, and researchers that have challenged the “pro-choice” label for 20 years, seen recently in New York Times and Huffington Post articles, is not only disheartening but, intentionally or not, continues the co-optation and erasure of the tremendously hard work done by Indigenous women and women of color for decades.

· · · · · 

Reproductive Justice: It’s About More Than Safe Abortion Care

The persistent focus on the links between “choice” and abortion—the origins of this relationship and some of its impacts—in no way fully expresses or honors the vision or the agenda of reproductive justice advocates.

The persistent focus on the links between “choice” and abortion—the origins of this relationship and some of its impacts—in no way fully expresses or honors the vision or the agenda of reproductive justice advocates.

· · · · · 

Beyond ‘Choice’: Youth-Focused Reproductive Rights and Justice Organization Renames Itself URGE

What does it mean to be pro-choice? For an increasing number of activists, advocates, and advocacy organizations, it includes wanting to be identified with an agenda more comprehensive than supporting a woman's right to choose abortion—as in, dropping the "choice" label entirely.

What does it mean to be pro-choice? For an increasing number of activists, advocates, and advocacy organizations, it includes wanting to be identified with an agenda more comprehensive than supporting a woman’s right to choose abortion—as in, dropping the “choice” label entirely.

· · · · · 

An Open Letter on the Importance of Reproductive Choice

Choice does not necessarily have to be in a name. But it needs to be at the core of our values, because respect for women's capacity to decide really does matter.

Choice does not necessarily have to be in a name. But it needs to be at the core of our values, because respect for women’s capacity to decide really does matter.

· · · · · 

Physicians Group: ‘We Absolutely Support the Right to Choose’

The president of Physicians for Reproductive Health responds to Ann Furedi’s spiked essay on abortion and choice.

The president of Physicians for Reproductive Health responds to Ann Furedi’s spiked essay questioning the organization’s decision to drop “choice” from its name.

· · · · · 

Understanding Reproductive Justice: A Response to O’Brien

We see the history and content of the reproductive justice framework and movement, and its critique of choice, quite differently.

“Inclusivity” and “intersectionality” are not just words. They describe the theory and practice of the reproductive justice movement with the potential to revitalize all of our advocacy and enable us to create the large and motivated base of support required to secure reproductive rights, health, and justice for all.

· · · · · 

Why We Are and Must Remain ‘Pro-Choice’

Both choice and reproductive justice have a place in our battle for women’s autonomy. But one cannot take the place of the other.

Both choice and reproductive justice have a place in our battle for women’s autonomy. But one cannot take the place of the other.

· · · · ·