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Screen More Women for Cervical Cancer — Not the Same Women More Often!

Problems with cervical cancer screening practices are a major contributor to more than 4,000 women per year dying of this 100% prevantable cancer.

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The Role of Community Health Centers in Reducing Cervical Cancer Inequities

Cervical cancer incidence rates vividly demonstrate inequities in our health care systems and in health outcomes. Women in rural areas, the elderly, those with less formal education, and women of color, for example, experience disproportionately high rates of cervical cancer. Meanwhile, in rural communities, uninsured white women have some of the poorest access to routine screening of any patient population.

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How to End Cervical Cancer? We Must Refocus on Common Sense, Medical Evidence and Love for Our Children

No woman should die from cervical cancer. Medical science has finally given us the tools to prevent the deaths of women living with it.

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Cars, Condoms, and Cervical Cancer: Get Vaccinated and Get Screened for Free!

What can you do? You can get screened. You can get vaccinated. You can let others know to get screened and get vaccinated.

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Cervical Cancer and Women of Color: What Will it Take to Get to Zero?

It is no secret that women of color—specifically Black and Latina women—are at greatest risk of cervical cancer. Ending cervical cancer will be no easy task. Great strides can be made by taking a multi-level approach to the problem, which includes expanding knowledge, empowering Black women to make their health a priority, and continued advocacy efforts.

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Latinas and Cervical Cancer: The Fight for Greater Health Care Access

No woman should be diagnosed, let alone die, of cervical cancer. For the first time, we have a comprehensive set of tools to prevent and fight the disease.

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The Role of “Men” in Preventing HPV-Related Cervical Cancer

Men have an important role to play in preventing the spread of HPV. It is too common for women (particularly women of color) to have barriers to screening services or accessing this vaccine. This makes it even more important for men to seek the vaccine and to encourage the women in their lives (particularly the ones they are having sex with) to also be vaccinated.

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What Will It Take To End Cervical Cancer?

A list of what it will take to end cervical cancer.

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Vaccinating Children Is a Social Responsibility We Can Not Afford To Shirk

Last year research linking vaccines to autism was debunked as a complete fabrication.  Now a new study shows that the HPV vaccine does not cause promiscuity. There are no excuses left.  Parents have an obligation to society to vaccinate their children.  Not doing so is selfish.

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Cervical Cancer is Preventable. Let’s Make it a Global Priority

CIES clinic in Bolivia where 400,000 health services are provided annually. Photograph courtesy of IPPF/WHR.

Diseases such as diabetes and cancer cause tens of millions of deaths each year, many of which are premature. Once the burden of rich countries, these non-communicable diseases are increasingly affecting individuals in low- and middle-income countries where they impose heavy burdens on already fragile health systems. Among the most deadly—and preventable—of these diseases is cervical cancer.

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