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What Does Dr. Oz Know About HPV? If His Show Is Any Indication, Not Much

Dr. Oz’s segment on HPV left much to be desired. It didn’t speak to all people at risk of HPV and cervical cancer, and deep ignorance was on display in the comments of some so-called expert panelists.

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How To Pay Homage To and Honor Henrietta Lacks?

How may we examine how we’ve benefitted from something horrific that we had nothing to do with but that allows for our existence today?

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Sexual Health Roundup: Promising Advances in HIV Prevention and Treatment; New Evidence on HPV, Cancer, and Vaccines

In this week’s sexual health roundup: scientists use engineered stem-cells to attack HIV; California tests a new pill that prevents HIV infection when taken daily but some question how expensive it is; the CDC releases alarming data on cancers caused by HPV in women; and South Carolina lawmakers take steps to increase HPV vaccination among middle school students.

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Opening STD Awareness Month with a Success Story: HPV and Cervical Cancer

I want to open this STD Awareness Blog series with a STD complication success story: fighting cervical cancer. Because here’s the thing: cervical cancer is almost completely preventable. This means that, given consistent and correct care, you will likely never been one of those 4,000 women who die of this preventable and treatable disease.

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Sexual Health Roundup: Say Goodbye to Your Annual Pap Test But Don’t Forget to Get Tested for Chlamydia

This week: Too few young women get tested for Chlamydia, circumcised men have lower rates of prostate cancer, new guidelines recommend less frequent Pap tests, and young people in the South fare worse than their peers when it comes to sexual health.

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Screen More Women for Cervical Cancer — Not the Same Women More Often!

Problems with cervical cancer screening practices are a major contributor to more than 4,000 women per year dying of this 100% prevantable cancer.

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The Role of Community Health Centers in Reducing Cervical Cancer Inequities

Cervical cancer incidence rates vividly demonstrate inequities in our health care systems and in health outcomes. Women in rural areas, the elderly, those with less formal education, and women of color, for example, experience disproportionately high rates of cervical cancer. Meanwhile, in rural communities, uninsured white women have some of the poorest access to routine screening of any patient population.

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How to End Cervical Cancer? We Must Refocus on Common Sense, Medical Evidence and Love for Our Children

No woman should die from cervical cancer. Medical science has finally given us the tools to prevent the deaths of women living with it.

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Cars, Condoms, and Cervical Cancer: Get Vaccinated and Get Screened for Free!

What can you do? You can get screened. You can get vaccinated. You can let others know to get screened and get vaccinated.

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Cervical Cancer and Women of Color: What Will it Take to Get to Zero?

It is no secret that women of color—specifically Black and Latina women—are at greatest risk of cervical cancer. Ending cervical cancer will be no easy task. Great strides can be made by taking a multi-level approach to the problem, which includes expanding knowledge, empowering Black women to make their health a priority, and continued advocacy efforts.

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