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Sexual Health Roundup: Promising Advances in HIV Prevention and Treatment; New Evidence on HPV, Cancer, and Vaccines

In this week’s sexual health roundup: scientists use engineered stem-cells to attack HIV; California tests a new pill that prevents HIV infection when taken daily but some question how expensive it is; the CDC releases alarming data on cancers caused by HPV in women; and South Carolina lawmakers take steps to increase HPV vaccination among middle school students.

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Kaiser Permanente: Dropping the Ball on Gay Men’s Sexual Health

Kaiser Permanente makes it incredibly challenging for gay men to get the STD tests they need, hurdles that help fuel the spread of STIs in our community – including HIV. This is especially troubling at a time when new antibiotic-resistant strains of gonorrhea have emerged.

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Teen Dating Violence – A Sad Reality

Statistics show that 1 in 3 teens will experience dating violence and more than two-thirds never come forward and tell anyone. According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), teen dating violence is a serious public health problem that is growing in the United States.

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2009 STD Data in the United States: Not a Pretty Picture

New data suggest mixed progress and ongoing challenges in the United States when it comes to the three most commonly reported STDs: Chlamydia, Gonorrhea, and Syphilis.

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Thanks to Medication Abortion, An Increasing Share of Abortions Take Place By or Before Nine Weeks

Ten years ago tomorrow (September 28th, 2010) the United States Food and Drug Administration approved the use of mifepristone along with misoprostol for early term abortions. Data from the Centers for Disease Control show that while the incidence of abortion has remained steady, the share of those performed very early in pregnancy has increased.

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Lessons From a Failed Syphilis Elimination Strategy

Syphillis is easily diagnosed and treated. Yet efforts to eliminate syphillis in specific geographic areas have failed because they ignored deep economic, social, and racial disparities that perpetuate the risks of infection and disease.

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