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CDC Takes Action on Antibiotic-Resistant Gonorrhea

The are over 700,000 cases of gonorrhea in the United States each year, and the bacteria itself has been changing and developing resistance to all but one class of antibiotics. With the likelihood that an antibiotic-resistant strain will be seen here soon, the CDC has released new treatment guidelines and a response a plan.

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No Clapping Matter: Antibiotic-Resistant Gonorrhea Is On the Way and We Are Not Prepared

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For years, even those in the public heath community paid little attention to gonorrhea because it was easy to prevent, easy to screen for, and easy to treat—at least it was until now. Gonorrhea is caused by wily bacteria that has become resistant to all-but-one class of antibiotics and we don’t have any others to throw at it. It’s time to take start taking notice.

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No News Is Not Necessarily Good News: 2011 YRBS Reveals Little Change in Teen Sexual Behavior

The CDC’s biennial survey of high school students came out today and once again it found no change in sexual risk behaviors among young people.  This means that after a decade of progress (between 1991 and 2001) nothing has changed in over a decade. Clearly, we could be doing better. 

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The Centers for Disease Control’s New Priorities for STD Prevention

The Centers for Disease Control recently established four priorities for STD prevention: Protecting the future health of adolescents and young people; protecting men who have sex with men; raising awareness about multi-drug resistant gonorrhea; and eliminating congenital syphilis.

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The Case for Increased Funding for Prevention of Sexually Transmitted Infections

Sexually transmitted infections cost the U.S. health care system $17 billion every year — and that number doesn’t even take into account the amount STDs cost to individuals in short-term and long-term consequences. We need more funding to prevent and treat these infections.

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Sexual Health Roundup: Promising Advances in HIV Prevention and Treatment; New Evidence on HPV, Cancer, and Vaccines

In this week’s sexual health roundup: scientists use engineered stem-cells to attack HIV; California tests a new pill that prevents HIV infection when taken daily but some question how expensive it is; the CDC releases alarming data on cancers caused by HPV in women; and South Carolina lawmakers take steps to increase HPV vaccination among middle school students.

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Study Finds Teen Parents Didn’t Think They Could Get Pregnant

A study out last week from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) found that half of teens who experienced an unintended pregnancy were not using birth control even though they did not want to get pregnant.

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New Report from CDC Finds Drop in Risky Sexual Behavior

This week the CDC released a report that suggests that Americans are practicing fewer risky behaviors when it comes to HIV transmission.

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Mathematical Model Says HPV Vaccine Should Only be Given to One Sex but Experts Disagree

A new study using a mathematical model suggests that public health efforts should focus on vaccinating either boys or girls against HPV but not both. The findings seem to counter a recent decision by the CDC which recommends vaccinating boys as well, but experts here say it is not time to start cancelling our son’s pediatrician appointments.

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CDC Committee Recommends HPV Vaccine for Boys; Will it Become Controversial Too?

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Today, a CDC advisory committee recommended that the HPV vaccine become a routine part of health care for 11-year-old boys as well as girls. Public and political reaction to this could serve as an interesting gauge of our double standard when it comes to adolescents and sex. 

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