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STI News: Chlamydia and Gonorrhea Rates Rise, STIs in NYC Concentrated in Low Income Zip Codes, and HPV Reactivates

Image: MedicineNet.com.

The CDC surveillance numbers for 2011 show that gonorrhea and chlamydia are up especially among young people and that three-quarters of all syphilis cases are among men who have sex with men; an analysis of STIs in New York City finds they are inextricably linked to poverty, and research suggests dormant HPV may reactivate as women near menopause.

 

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Babies on Hold: Data Show Women Acting to Make Better Lives for Themselves and Their Families

New CDC birth data out Wednesday confirm that the U.S. birthrate dropped one percent to reach an all-time low in 2011, extending the downward trend begun with the recession in 2008. Put down your knee-jerk fears about smaller population. This drop is a good sign, foretelling not a diminished but a strengthened workforce down the line.  

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From STD Prevention to Sexual Health, and Back

There is a lot to like about a more positive approach towards sexuality, but a causal link between better sexual health and lower pregnancy and STI rates ultimately requires scientific evidence that goes beyond intuitive reasoning.

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CDC Takes Action on Antibiotic-Resistant Gonorrhea

The are over 700,000 cases of gonorrhea in the United States each year, and the bacteria itself has been changing and developing resistance to all but one class of antibiotics. With the likelihood that an antibiotic-resistant strain will be seen here soon, the CDC has released new treatment guidelines and a response a plan.

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No Clapping Matter: Antibiotic-Resistant Gonorrhea Is On the Way and We Are Not Prepared

Gonorrhea. [img src]

For years, even those in the public heath community paid little attention to gonorrhea because it was easy to prevent, easy to screen for, and easy to treat—at least it was until now. Gonorrhea is caused by wily bacteria that has become resistant to all-but-one class of antibiotics and we don’t have any others to throw at it. It’s time to take start taking notice.

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No News Is Not Necessarily Good News: 2011 YRBS Reveals Little Change in Teen Sexual Behavior

The CDC’s biennial survey of high school students came out today and once again it found no change in sexual risk behaviors among young people.  This means that after a decade of progress (between 1991 and 2001) nothing has changed in over a decade. Clearly, we could be doing better. 

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The Centers for Disease Control’s New Priorities for STD Prevention

The Centers for Disease Control recently established four priorities for STD prevention: Protecting the future health of adolescents and young people; protecting men who have sex with men; raising awareness about multi-drug resistant gonorrhea; and eliminating congenital syphilis.

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The Case for Increased Funding for Prevention of Sexually Transmitted Infections

Sexually transmitted infections cost the U.S. health care system $17 billion every year — and that number doesn’t even take into account the amount STDs cost to individuals in short-term and long-term consequences. We need more funding to prevent and treat these infections.

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Sexual Health Roundup: Promising Advances in HIV Prevention and Treatment; New Evidence on HPV, Cancer, and Vaccines

In this week’s sexual health roundup: scientists use engineered stem-cells to attack HIV; California tests a new pill that prevents HIV infection when taken daily but some question how expensive it is; the CDC releases alarming data on cancers caused by HPV in women; and South Carolina lawmakers take steps to increase HPV vaccination among middle school students.

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Study Finds Teen Parents Didn’t Think They Could Get Pregnant

A study out last week from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) found that half of teens who experienced an unintended pregnancy were not using birth control even though they did not want to get pregnant.

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