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The Media’s Role in Attaining Justice for Black and Missing Persons

When the media neglects to cover Black missing person stories, it is omitting the fact that people care about missing Black women and girls, and permitting the conditions for this toxic environment of invisibility and violent actions with no recourse to thrive.

When the media neglects to cover Black missing person stories, it is omitting the fact that people care about missing Black women and girls, and permitting the conditions for this toxic environment of invisibility and violent actions with no recourse to thrive.

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And Still She Wrote: Remembering Maya Angelou

Maya Angelou

Dr. Maya Angelou’s life could not be contained by a single autobiography, so she wrote six, making the audacious claim that she—as a Black woman reared in the segregated South—was fully human and a worthy historical subject who needed no outside narrator to tell or validate her story.

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Banning ‘Bossy’ Won’t Help Black Women and Girls Seeking Justice

For many Black women, being called "bossy" and being bossy have the potential to save and change our lives, as we saw in the recent events surrounding CeCe McDonald (above) and Marissa Alexander.

Sheryl Sandberg and others want to see us ban the word “bossy” when talking about girls. But for many Black women, being called “bossy” and being bossy have the potential to save and change our lives.

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It’s Time to Rethink Black History Month

Rosa Parks (above on right) did not simply sit on a bus, she also fought long and hard against a rape culture that left the sexual assault of young black women around the country.

What is often lost in Black History Month are the contributions of Black women and the present-day concerns of all Black people in the United States.

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Dylan Byers and the Scourge of Privileged Defensiveness

People in positions of privilege frequently have blind spots for the work, achievements, and culture of people who are different than them.

Byers’ response to Ta-Nehisi Coates calling Melissa Harris-Perry “America’s foremost public intellectual” illustrates an important problem: People in positions of privilege frequently have blind spots for the work, achievements, and culture of people who are different than them.

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On Medicaid, Shame, and Not Being Silent

Shame is a powerful cultural and political tool that has been used to keep people from accessing the resources they need.

Shame is a powerful cultural and political tool that has been used to keep people from accessing the resources they need. Shame has kept my name anonymous in this article, but it will not stop me from accessing health care, telling this story, or encouraging others to do the same.

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Of #FastTailedGirls and Freedom

A tweet from the author as part of the #FastTailedGirls conversation on Twitter, which was started by Hood Feminism.

Like a lot of others, I was a “fast-tailed girl” before I really understood what those words meant.

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For Black Women, Everything Is a Feminist Issue

There have been many articles decrying Michelle Obama's "un-feminist" choices.

There have been many articles decrying Michelle Obama’s “un-feminist” choices. What these criticisms fail to acknowledge is that for women who are not single and childless/childfree, feminist choices often include a focus on their families and communities. This is particularly true of Black feminists.

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Michelle Obama’s Garden Is Political

First Lady Michelle Obama is interviewed in the White House vegetable garden.

People who think food is apolitical don’t know much about food, just like people who think taking care of kids isn’t important don’t know much about kids. Devaluing either isn’t just ignorant, it’s dismissive of the women who take on these essential roles to life and society.

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What We Talk About When We Talk About Black Unwed Mothers: A Q&A With Tanya Fields of the BLK Projek

Fields drew attention during a recent live-streamed conversation between bell hooks and Melissa Harris-Perry, when she asked about the tearing down of Black unmarried mothers by other Black women.

Fields drew attention during a recent live-streamed conversation between bell hooks and Melissa Harris-Perry, when she asked about the tearing down of Black unmarried mothers by other Black women. RH Reality Check spoke with her about being a woman of color leader, stereotypes placed on Black unmarried mothers, and more.

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