· · · · · 

Why the Women’s Rights Movement Must Listen to Sex Workers

Sex workers organized by Kthi Win. [img src]

To label and disregard sex workers as “victims” who cannot comprehend their true “enslavement” is condescending, disempowering, and untrue. 

· · · · · 

Dispatches from AWID 2012: Queer Economics

What does it mean to be queer and poor? How does one affect the other? At AWID 2012, a panel of GLBTQ advocates discussed their experiences exploring these intersections of sexuality, power, and economic justice. 

· · · · · 

Dispatches from AWID 2012: A Day in the Life of a Sex Worker

Sex for money might take just five minutes. But what about the rest of the 7 hours and 55 minutes of a sex worker’s day? What does she do, who does she see, and how is she treated? At AWID 2012, an interactive game provided insights into these overlooked questions.

· · · · · 

Dispatches from AWID 2012: The New World War? Fundamentalism vs. Human Rights

Fundamentalist religious movements are gaining ground everywhere we look. What does it mean for human rights, and more importantly, how can we move the human rights agenda forward, effectively? A panel of experts on religion and rights examined this question at AWID 2012.

· · · · · 

Dispatches from AWID 2012: Arab Spring Becomes a Chill for Women, But The Organizing Continues

Young Arab women have led and are leading the charge for women’s rights in the Arab world. Yet spring has turned quickly to winter and the prospects they face are grimmer than the world may have realized. At AWID 2012, young Arab women activists speak for themselves.

· · · · · 

Dispatches From AWID 2012: Women’s Land Rights Debate Roils On

In many regions of the world, women produce the majority of the food consumed by their families and communities, and make up the majority of the world’s small-scale farmers, yet own the rights to almost none of the land. At AWID 2012, experts examined what is changing and how.

· · · · · 

Dispatches From AWID 2012: Burmese Women’s Groups to World: Hold the Applause

At AWID 2012, Burmese women’s groups described the culture of fear, oppression, and abuse still rife within the country, and warned the international community not to celebrate just yet.

· · · · ·