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Yes, Camille Paglia, Let’s Put Sex Back in Sex Ed—But Not Fear, Shame, or Stereotypes

sex education chalkboard

In a recent editorial, Paglia argues for moving toward a sex ed model in which young people learn reproductive biology in one class, study sexually transmitted diseases in another, and get a healthy dose of fear, shame, and gender stereotypes in yet another. But sexuality educators disagree.

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36 Seconds Is Not Enough Time for Doctors to Discuss Sex With Teens

Susan Allen, director of marketing and communications at Planned Parenthood of the Heartland, told RH Reality Check that LB 1032 is unnecessary legislation because information about coercion is already provided for all patients considering abortion in Nebraska.

A new study suggests that many doctors are not talking to their teenage patients about sexuality, and those who are spend an average of just over half a minute on this important topic.

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Condoms in Schools: A Smart Move, But a Tough Sell

Despite good research, myths about condoms leading to higher rates of sexual activity persist.

A local television station asked San Antonio parents how they felt about the American Academy of Pediactrics’ new suggestion that schools make condoms available to students. The results suggest that despite good research, myths about condoms leading to higher rates of sexual activity persist.

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High School Cheerleaders Benched for Handing Out Condoms

The varsity cheerleading squad in Wharton, Texas, warmed the bench last Friday night because of a homecoming gag that provided condoms to the football team. I'd call this an over-reaction and missed opportunity in a state where high school sexual activity rates are higher than the national average.

The varsity cheerleading squad in Wharton, Texas, warmed the bench last Friday night because of a homecoming gag that provided condoms to the football team. I’d call this an over-reaction and missed opportunity in a state where high school sexual activity rates are higher than the national average.

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The Time Has Come: Free Condoms in Every High School

Sex Week is coming to the University of Tennessee's Knoxville campus but some state legislators really, really wish it wasn't.

The American Academy of Pediatrics has issued a new set of recommendations encouraging schools, parents, and communities to focus on destigmatizing condoms and making them more available to teenagers. What was once a radical idea is quickly becoming normalized.

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Pediatricians Group Advocates for Greater Condom Access for Teens

condoms

The American Academy of Pediatrics released a statement Monday arguing that all barriers to condom access for teens should be removed because increased availability increases use—but does not increase sexual activity.

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Circumcision Rates Down 10 Percent Over Past Three Decades. Why?

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New research shows that the practice of newborn circumcision is falling out of favor, despite the fact that the data suggests the benefits of the procedure far outweigh the costs.

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The American Academy of Pediatrics Releases New Guidelines on LGBTQ Youth

"The effects of homophobia and heterosexism can contribute to health disparities in mental health with higher rates of depression and suicidal ideation, higher rates of substance abuse, and more sexually transmitted and HIV infections."

Among other things, the guidelines advise pediatricians’ offices to be teen-friendly and welcoming to all adolescents, regardless of sexual orientation and behavior; this includes training office staff and ensuring that office forms do not presume heterosexuality of patients (or parents).

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Major Medical Societies Call For End to Legislative Intrusion Into Women’s Medical Care and Decisions

Original Photo: WebMD.

The medical community has been clear: intrusive laws restricting abortion care undermine the relationship between health care providers and their patients and are based on political ideology, not on providing the best possible care.

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The Nation’s Doctors Speak Up for Contraception Access

Photo: Drugwatch.

The nation’s doctors are speaking up for expanded access to contraception. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists endorsed making oral contraceptives available without a prescription and emergency contraception over-the-counter. The American Academy of Pediatrics suggested that pediatricians give young women prescriptions for Emergency Contraception before they need it. 

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