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The Global Commission on HIV and the Law and the Recent Namibia Court Ruling on Forced Sterilization

A judgment by the high court in Namibia in favor of three women who claimed they had been sterilized without their informed consent confirms the principle that in order for consent to be truly “informed,” it must be freely given and clearly understood.

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Global AIDS Policy: Still Rife With Stigma and Discrimination

If we are fighting HIV, we need to join hands no matter whether we are straight, gay, sex workers, whatever…but with no discrimination. This is high time we tell the US government they should respect all human rights – whether you are a sex worker, straight, gay, disabled. We are all equal.

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Who is a “Criminal?” Exclusion of Vulnerable Groups from International AIDS Conference Nothing to Celebrate

Protesters disrupt the panel of US Senators at the Conference. Think Progress.

The definition of criminal offenses, the selective implementation of the law, and the resulting stereotypes generate a self-enforcing loop of discrimination and exclusion to the detriment of all. The exclusion of so many legitimate voices from this year’s AIDS conference is just one example.

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Why are Human Rights so Central to the AIDS Response in Eastern Europe, Central Asia, and Everywhere Else?

Steve Forrest/©IAS.

We will only be able to get people into treatment early, and retain them in treatment, if we finally move from rhetoric to real action on HIV and human rights.

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AIDS 2012 Still Missing the Mark: The Good and the Bad on Women’s Rights

A rights-based perspective for the global AIDS response requires addressing the comprehensive needs of women and girls, including those seen in areas that do not “conform” to the focus on motherhood and marriage.

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Why Human Rights Must Occupy the Centre of the Global AIDS Response

Steve Forrest/©IAS.

The AIDS response is not just about an epidemic; the AIDS response is, has been, and must be, an instrument to fight for social justice. It requires us to confront and overcome the inequalities that wrongly separate people into “deserving” and “undeserving”.

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Bad Laws Hindering the Global Response to HIV

The US immigration rules place restrictions on the ability of sex workers and people who use drugs to enter the country. These rules are but one example of the many ways in which national and international laws, regulations and policies are impacting on the HIV vulnerability of most at-risk groups across the world.

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Integrated Reproductive and Sexual Health Services Make Good Sense

Integrated sexual and reproductive health services mean providing HIV prevention and testing, contraceptive care, and other services all under the same roof. With this simple and cost-effective solution, we could potentially save the lives of millions of women and children around the world. 

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‘Treatment as Prevention’ Can’t Succeed Without a Major Focus on Human Rights

Steve Forrest/©IAS.

We need to support the implementation of evidence-based health policy and effectively address the needs of communities infected and affected by HIV. We need to fully embrace the Washington DC declaration. Only then can we truly turn the tide together.

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A Call to Change U.S. Policy on Sex Work and HIV

Kaytee Riek.

The U.S. law that prohibits sex workers and drug users from attending the IAC from abroad is a frightening sign of the times. As co-directors of two U.S-based sex workers rights organizations, we stand with sex workers in their global fight for rights.

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